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Explore the various presentations of love in Shakespeare's 'Romeo and Juliet', including a discussion of the different characters' perspectives.

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Introduction

Explore the various presentations of love in Shakespeare's 'Romeo and Juliet', including a discussion of the different characters' perspectives. In the first two acts of Romeo and Juliet are filled with impulsive decisions and interpretations of love, mixed with other emotions. Romeo, the principal male character is, at first unsure about his love for Rosaline. The audience comes to believe that it is lust, not love that drives him to thinking he feels strongly about her. He mentions that his love is unrequited, when he tells Benvolio that he is "out of her favour where I am in love," indicating that he loves her and she does not return the passion and lust that he dreams of. Romeo at this point is not only portrayed as being disheartened, but extremely confused as well. He speaks with oxymoronic words such as "cold fire, bright smoke and sick health," showing that he might not actually know what he wants. ...read more.

Middle

It also shows that maybe love is the only thing that makes him continue. Juliet's mind works slightly differently at the beginning of the play. When Lady Capulet raises the subject of marriage. She says that "it is an honour," meaning that it is a privilege to be married. When kissing Romeo at her father's party, Juliet tells her newfound love, "You kiss by th'book." This quotation shows that he is very professional, raisin the issue of whether he has kissed so much that he has become an expert. This could raises suspicion in the reader, as it could possibly raise the issue of whether Romeo actually loves Juliet, or is lustful. When he tells her that he is "so unsatisfied" she is alerted and comments back and asks, "What satisfaction canst thou have tonight?" This playful banter is well written by Shakespeare and is these innuendos continue throughout the play. ...read more.

Conclusion

Now art thou sociable, now art thou Romeo." This quotation tells us that Romeo is only himself when not in love. The two Capulets see love as a financial opportunity. They have no care for their daughter wants or needs and see an arranged marriage to be much more effective. She says that "gold clasps lock in the golden story, so that you shall share all that he doth possesses," referring to Count Paris. Romeo's friends see his as a childlike character, unaware of the world around his, unaware of what will happen in the forthcoming act. The Capulet nurse, mentor and carer for Juliet, sympathizes with her and helps her to make the right decisions. William Shakespeare shows well how complicated and unexpected love can be. With regard to the ages of Romeo and Juliet, they are very young and it seems irregular that two fourteen-year-old 'children' would suddenly fall head over heels in love. Love is portrayed excellently and presented with emotive and complex structure, which interweave with the overall plot of the play. ...read more.

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