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Explore the way Matilda is presented throughout the novel, paying particular attention to her relationship with her mother and Mr Watts. Refer to the language devices and techniques used by the author: Lloyd Jones to present the character.

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Introduction

Explore the way Matilda is presented throughout the novel, paying particular attention to her relationship with her mother and Mr Watts. Refer to the language devices and techniques used by the author: Lloyd Jones to present the character. Jones enables many diverse readers all over the world to slip into the role of Matilda, regardless to their understanding of her culture. He uses a variety of subtle techniques throughout the novel which assists him in achieving this. Matilda?s views of the main individuals in her life change considerably throughout the book. At the beginning, she views Mr Watts in the same way as her fellow islanders. Jones uses short sentences and colloquial language in the first few chapters to illustrate Matilda?s age, and her oblivion. For example, the boldness of her statements, ?his nose was already big?, and ?his large eyes in his large head?, reflects her age. ...read more.

Middle

Matilda warms to Mr Watts because he has knowledge of the outside world, which she is craves to know about. He gave her Great Expectations which becomes her escape from the overwhelming conflict. Matilda compares herself to Pip because she understands that he has ?that small, fragile place he squeezed into between his awful sister and loveable Joe Gargery because the same space came to exist between Mr Watts and my mum.? Jones uses imagery to portray to his readers a World which they are not familiar with. He shows this mainly through the lessons of the islanders, by using language that would not generally be used in our society, such as the way they describe colour. Also, the different lifestyles for example at the top of page one hundred and sixty nine, where Matilda speaks of nature determining time. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, she still admires her teacher. When she enters the white world she changes her language, it becomes more sophisticated as she studies further Dickens. In the last few chapters Matilda is very philosophical; everything she has learnt suddenly falls into place. Jones gave his readers an experience of the Bougainville civil war from the perspective of a thirteen year old girl. Her experiences matured her, and in the end she says ?I would try to return home.? This is left up to the readers own imagination of what home now is. The language techniques used help the reader to imagine the island. In my opinion, Matilda?s mother represents her life on the Island, it is a part of her past which she did love but is now dead and gone. She believed that Mr Watts represented the white World, but she discovers that she has to have her own experiences. ...read more.

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