• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Focusing on Tickets please discuss the ways in which DH Lawrence presents feminine strength and power.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Focusing on Tickets please discuss the ways in which DH Lawrence presents feminine strength and power Tickets please is set at the time of war, when all the men who were not disabled, too old or too young were at war. The society is very female dominated, with women doing the jobs of men. The tram girls have power. The girls are described as "fearless young hussies" who "pounce on the youths who try to evade their ticket machine". This use of descriptive language portrays the girls as tough and lively, with attitude. The pounce on the youths, this feline like motion makes the girls sound like predatory cats. The tram girls are powerful. The placement of the strong tram girls next to the "delicate young men" emphasise their strength, the women are stronger than the men. ...read more.

Middle

Annie is attracted to John Thomas, but DH Lawrence shows her to have strength of character, as she is able to resist John Thomas, despite his flirtatious behaviour, and his ability to "vanquish one girl then another". John Thomas has power over women, but Annie has the strength and power over herself to resist him. Annie it seems, is the only one that John Thomas sincerely likes, "more than the usual", this shows that Annie has emotional power over John Thomas, and D H Lawrence uses her strength over him to link the theme of feminine power with the theme of relationships between men and women. D H Lawrence shows Annie to be stronger than the other girls in the story. Many of the girls left their jobs when they had been left by John, but not only does Annie keep her job, she also is determined to have revenge. ...read more.

Conclusion

All the girls 'fly' at him. Not only is this an animal like movement, but also the girls are moving as a pack, like lionesses. They are strong and animal like. They have an eerie mad power and strength over John Thomas that is animal like and somewhat hideous. They are violently and physically powerful. At this point in the story, D H Lawrence shows the tram girls to have an un-human, unnatural power and strength. However their physical power is ironic, as it reflects upon their mental weakness. They had to hurt him, and they could not think of any other way to do so without using violence. Throughout the story, D H Lawrence presents the tram girls as having very different types of power, using language devices, irony and imagery to describe their actions. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE DH Lawrence section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE DH Lawrence essays

  1. Comparison Essay: The Shades of Spring & Things by D.H Lawrence. An analysis on ...

    Again with Syson's dialogue, Syson tries to express how free he is in the way in which he talks about the environment. In addition to this, Syson's perception of the environment also portrays this same idea. An example of this is when Syson is talking to Hilda, and Hilda replies

  2. Why Is the Story called Fanny and Annie?

    she had the most admiration for Harry, for he was a soloist in the choir where he had a "certain winsomeness," the church itself had been vividly depicted by Lawrence, " and again the little old chapel was a bower,..."

  1. "Examine DH Lawrence's 'Mountain Lion' and 'Snake', showing how the poet a) uses language ...

    There is a strong feeling of sorrow towards the mountain lion. A great wrong has been done, an immoral injustice towards the mountain lion. The Mexicans are still embarrassed and smiling "foolishly". The mountain lion is described in depth, a thing of beauty.

  2. Critical appraisal of DH Lawrence's short story, 'Odour of Chrysanthemums', making use of stylistic ...

    is dehumanised as he never appears as a live character and is spoken about more like an animal than a human.( ) Elizabeth herself is developed upon and we are left with her feelings of herself at the end of the story.

  1. Consider the different ways, including use of language, that each writer uses to get ...

    Both the stories I have discussed so far have been written in the third person. However, Lawrence writes from the point of view of an omniscient narrator and he is able to describe the thoughts and feelings of other characters, not just Annie.

  2. "Snake" By D. H. Lawrence - review

    Here the poet started to scorn the human beings and human teachings because it made him lose the sight of the thing that was very fascinating to him. In the 14th stanza, the poet used literary allusion in borrowing the image of the "albatross" from Coleridge's "Rime of the Ancient

  1. David Herbert Lawrence - review of The Rainbow

    Later that evening, Ursula gains an astute awareness of Skrebensky's psychological makeup. Similar to Anna and Will's momentous sheaving scene, Ursula is transformed and set free by the presence of the moonlight. "Her naked self was away there beating under the moonlight, dashing the moonlight with her breasts and her knees, in meeting, in communion.

  2. D.H. Lawrence - A personal review.

    He dropped the novel for some years and rewrote the story in an old Sicilian farm-house near Taormina in 1920. Lawrence's best known work is LADY CHATTERLY'S LOVER, first published privately in Florins in 1928, tells of the love affair between a wealthy, married woman, and a man who works on her husband's estate.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work