• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Frankenstein's creation is it a creature or indeed a monster?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Frankenstein Assignment Whether Frankenstein's creation is a creature or indeed a monster is a key factor of the novel as a whole. Mary Shelley successfully uses language to create and manipulate the reader's opinion of this nameless creation. Frankenstein is from a well respected and well educated family; "my family is one of the most distinguished of that republic". This immediately gives the reader the impression that he will be a benevolent character. The reader feels sympathy for Frankenstein when his mother dies as it is very hard for him "The despair that is exhibited on countenance..." It is obvious that this affected Frankenstein deeply, which lead to the creation of the being. His intentions were good; "If I could banish disease from the human frame and render man invulnerable to any but a violent death". His mother's death spurred on his ambition to do this, which lead to him becoming so engrossed in his work that he forgot all about society and morals. Just before the creation of the creature Mary Shelley creates a semantic field of superstition leading to decay using words associated with religion and death "the churchyard to me was merely the receptacle of bodies deprived of life," This links in directly to Frankenstein's loss of morals and shows how he is beginning to lose touch with humanity. ...read more.

Middle

"I imagine that they would be disgusted, until by my gentle demeanour and conciliatory words, I should first win their favour and afterwards their love." When the creature makes friends with the old man, the reader empathises with the happiness the being felt at being accepted "Every minute was precious to me". The being is full of fear at the same time as he knows that if he fails to win the family's friendship he is "an outcast in the world forever". The cottagers return and beat him violently with a stick in an attempt to rid him from their home and the monster doesn't even fight back because he loves them so much. This makes the reader feel very sad and sympathetic towards the being. Also they will empathise with what he is feeling as the family were presented as a kind and benevolent group, so this change in character would help the reader see how the being feels. It makes it worse that such a kind family reject him. From this point onwards the being's character changes. He becomes more like the evil monster which Frankenstein had described. "...despair had not yet taken possession of me; my feelings were those of rage and revenge. ...read more.

Conclusion

When he began to find his hatred he was like a rebellious teenager, and when he reflected on what he'd done and admitted he was wrong, he was the adult. All through his life he was rejected. However to readers of Shelley's era, Frankenstein would probably appear evil as he was 'doing the unimaginable'. This may have caused some people to reject the book because of its subject and how it deals with the issue of 'usurping god' and how humanity deals with deformities in humans. Reactions to the being would be a lot different today; society is not tied to religion as strongly as it was then so he probably would be accepted as a largely disfigured human. People would be a lot more reserved in their reactions to him, it is unlikely that anyone would scream in horror and run away at the sight of him but some people still may try and avoid him and he might even be jeered at. All of this however would be a huge improvement on the situation the being faces in the novel. Readers of the novel back then may have felt less sympathy for the being that modern day readers because of the differences in society. I think Mary Shelley used the being to challenge society's views of people with deformities and has done this to good effect. Charlotte Harper 10MPC ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Mary Shelley section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Mary Shelley essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Compare the two chapters which describe the creation of Frankenstein(TM)s monster.

    4 star(s)

    His ambition had troubled consequences just like Frankensteins. Both Ross' attempt and the books publish date were both in the year of 1818: could it be that society in those days had ambitions substantially farfetched to those which could be achieved.

  2. 'Frankenstein Essay' - With reference to chapters 11-16, trace the development and change in ...

    Again he lies alone with his thoughts, from his recollection he knew that his creator Victor Frankenstein had mentioned Geneva as his native town. He decided to travel and meet his cursed creator. He does this because he knows that Victor is the only person he could receive help from.

  1. Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' and William Golding's 'Lord Of The Flies' both portray 'the evil ...

    William Golding lived through the two biggest wars in history. During his time in the Navy, he had a constant reminder of the evil and brutality in the hearts of men. He saw countless lives lost around him, some belonging to his friends.

  2. In Frankenstein,how does Shelley inspire sympathy for the creature?

    Victor, who created the monster, says, "How can I describe my emotions at this catastrophe... I had selected his features as beautiful. Beautiful! - Great God!...His yellow skin...his hair a lustrous black...dun white sockets...shriveled complexion and straight black lips...the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart."

  1. 'The novel is a powerful examination of, challenge to, what is good and evil ...

    In fact, Victor dies in complete ignorance and hostility. It is questionable as to Shelley's purpose behind the tale of Victor in the first place. In his seemingly untimely death of ignorance, and ultimately the failure of his task, there is arguably, no sense of wholesome satisfaction offered to the reader from such a conclusion described.

  2. Some critics view the creature in Mary Shelley(TM)s Frankenstein as a victim, others as ...

    After Walton's narration, Frankenstein starts to tell his narration which is then followed by the creature narration which then goes back to the Frankenstein's narration - this is called embedded narrative. An embedded narrative is a story enclosed within a frame narrative (a tale within a tale).

  1. How is the creature presented in chapters 11-16 of Frankenstein?

    He is also presented like a human as he states "I sat down and wept". This shows that he has an appetite like humans and responds in the same manner as a newborn baby by crying. He is similar to newborns in this respect as newborn babies tend to cry when they are hungry.

  2. Sympathy for the Devil? How does Mary Shelley persuade the reader to pity ...

    Frankenstein's two lecturers at the University of Ingolstadt both have different view on him. M. Krempe disagrees with Frankenstein's views on science and tells him to restart his studies. "Have you really spent your time in studying such nonsense?" M.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work