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Great expectations

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Introduction

English Literature Coursework Essay Unit 3 How does Dickens create tension and interest in chapters 1 and 8 of "Great Expectations"? Charles Dickens was born 7th February 1812 and died 9th June 1870. He was the most popular English novelist of the Victorian era. He created some very memorable characters and included the theme of social reform throughout his work. The work that Dickens created used very complex and convoluted sentences and made all of his stories believable by including real life experiences. He also creates interest by using imagery and figures of speech. The novel is about a boy growing up with no family but his sister and has no proper education. The novel begins with Phillip Pirrip or Pip being a poor child but then he comes into some money and has 'great expectations' but does not know how or why this has happened. The two chapters studied included Pip being threatened by an escaped convict and Pip being moved to live with a different family. Dickens creates tension in these two chapters to keep the reader interested and excited. ...read more.

Middle

Also the description of this character creates interest and tension. "A man who had been soaked in water, and smothered in mud, and lamed by stones, and cut by flints" This shows that the convict has been through a lot of pain a misery and this creates interest for the reader. The reader knows that this character is an escaped convict as it says that he had "a great iron on his leg" and this was given to prisoners in those days to try and stop them from escaping, and this immediately creates tension and fear as he has obviously committed a crime before and so will not be afraid to do it again and so the reader is worried about pip at this point. This paragraph also says that he was "a man with no hat" and this creates interest and suspicion as in this time men always used to wear a hat as this was what they did and this shows that he is not a normal person and so this shows interest to the reader. This shows how Dickens created tension and interest in the description of his characters and how they spoke in this story. ...read more.

Conclusion

This phrase suggests that Pip was beaten when he was growing up when he did something wrong and here he is being threatened to be hit I he misbehaves. This creates interest and tension as there is a chance that Pip will be hit and this makes the reader fear for Pip and want to help him. Also when Dickens describes a character of sitting "corpse like" it creates tension for the reader as it suggests that she is very old and that she looks very scary and strange. It creates the effect of darkness and ghosts as this is associated with the dead and this helps to create tension and to keep the reader interested. Overall in the two chapters I found that the use of different complex techniques such as pathetic fallacy and the thrilling description of the setting and surroundings, and also the characters and their way of speech made the text very exciting and also created lots of tension and interest that kept the reader entertained and amused. It created sympathy and empathy in the reader and was also very believable as real life experiences had been used and so this interested the reader even more. ?? ?? ?? ?? Guy Saunders ...read more.

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