• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Great Expectations

Extracts from this document...


I wWith close reference to the text, how is mood and atmosphere created in the opening chapter of 'Great Expectations' by Charles Dickens. Charles Dickens is the author of "Great Expectations" and he was born in eighteen twelve in Portsmouth. His family were great inspiration for the characters in his books as the character Mr. Micawber in David Copperfield was based on his father. All of Dickens book were very similar in the fact that they were all about lower class people. This shows that Dickens felt empathy towards them. Dickens could relate to this as his family were quite poor. "Great Expectations" was first published serially in magazines in eighteen sixty. The novel is suitable for Victorian audiences because they could relate to the content of the novel, for example, the standard of living; the fact that women were seen as less important than men and Pips lifestyle. Dickens uses personal pronouns like, My, I and We, which makes the reader feel more involved in the story and they can imagine what it would have been like for the characters. ...read more.


Pip had to draw conclusions from the descriptions on their gravestones," derived from their tombstones." You feel empathy towards Pip as he still has love for his mother and father. A technique that Dickens expends is describing the setting at the beginning of the chapter. That graveyard at the start of the chapter is a typical example of how the setting contributes to the novel because in order to capture the reader's imagination the description must be able to paint a picture in your head. Dickens describes the graveyard as a, "bleak place overgrown with nettles." The use of the word "bleak" creates atmosphere as it makes the place sound cold and unwelcoming. To follow on from this, Dickens uses alliteration to describe the setting, "low, leaden line." This is used to describe the river on the marshland. "leaden" means lead coloured or dull and heavy, which suggests the river was dull and lead-coloured. This creates a sombre atmosphere. Dickens leaves the first piece of dialogue until after the description, which builds up suspense. ...read more.


Another technique Dickens uses is leaving the first piece of dialogue until the description is over, the first piece of dialogue is, "Hold your noise!" We don't know who says this until Dickens describes the character. Dickens also describes how the character spoke, in this case it says, "cried a terrible voice." This creates an unpleasant atmosphere. Dickens creates a vexatious atmosphere by creating a fast pace when Pip meets the convict. The description of the convict is very fast paced and puts a picture in your head which creates atmosphere, "soaked in water, smothered in mud and lamed by stones." "for he was so sudden and strong," this shows that the convict is a powerful character in this part of the story. Dickens describes scenes in great detail so you can picture it, "he looked in my young eyes as if he were eluding the hands of dead people, stretching up cautiously out of the graves, to get a twist upon his ankle and pull him in." This description creates mood because you can picture it in your head. You can also imagine how Pip is feeling with this description in his head. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Great Expectations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Great Expectations essays

  1. Charles Dickens's writing techniques in Great Expectations.

    the Hulks because they murder, and because they rob and forge and do all sorts of bad: and they always begin by asking questions" (12). Since Pip was not allowed to do numerous things, he became a secluded person for most of his childhood and early teens.

  2. Great Expectations: Father figures, mentors and patrons

    Joe is also the only character in the novel with no real property. All that he counts as his own are his tools; all else, in Joe's mind, belongs to Mrs. Joe. His freedom from material goods and the desire for them sets him apart from the "gentlemen" like Pumblechook in the novel.

  1. Great Expectations

    (66) The appearance that this house would be "enough" for the Havishams shows what kind of people that they really are in reality. Satis house was "of old brick, and dismal, and had a great many iron bars to it. Some of the windows had been walled up; of those that remained, all the lower were rustily barred."

  2. fear and atmosphere great expectations

    are paradoxical to the novel's title, which is 'Great Expectations', that may suggest a story of glory and success. The use of alliteration is present in the novel, like "low leaden line", to emphasize on such feelings as depression or loneliness through the setting and indirectly towards the main character, Pip.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work