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Great expectations-scene one and scene 39

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Introduction

How does Dickens create sympathy and tension is his readers in chapter 1 and chapter 39? Great expectation is a novel, wrote in a semi-autobiographic style by Charles Dickens about the expectations of an orphan called pip, who is the protagonist of the story, writing about his life from his childhood to adulthood. It was first published in a magazine article as a twenty part series through out 1860 to 1861, and was later published as a novel. The story is set in Victorian society, and its main theme is rich and poor along with the theme of gratitude, and how for or the first time in history you could become rich without owning land because of the industrial revelation, so people could 'make' money without inheriting it, and it was the birth of the 'nouveau riche', people who had standing in society through work rather than title. Dickens grew up with a cruel and brutal father. Which is why many of his novels it contains cruel and brutal adults because of his upbringing, as it does in great expectations. Dickens chose the storyline because at the time it would have been believable and inspirational and this is what made the novel so successful because the story reflects what could have been reality. In chapter 39 pip is not recognisable to the young morally upstanding boy he was in chapter 1, not only has he grown up and his appearances changed but he's changed who he is, and it now an upper class citizen. ...read more.

Middle

This tells us that Pip was morally upstanding, and makes us like him and feel sympathetic. Then in chapter 39 a completely different side of Pip is portrayed. He is made to seem snobbish, and when He meets Magwitch he is shocked and disgusted by his presence, and doesn't try to hide his abhorrence towards Magwitch, simply telling him to "stay!" and "keep off!" when Magwitch tries to embrace him, showing Pip still see's him at the desperate common criminal he was all those years ago. This creates tension, as Pip makes the situation awkward and discomforting, and starts to give the impression he's not going to help Magwitch, which leaves the reader on edge asking the question will he or wont he? Pip is also shown as slightly arrogant and boastful, as he boasts to Magwitch about his life saying "I've done wonderful well. There's others went out alonger me and has done well too, but no man has done nigh as well as me. I'm famous for it", this shows the reader that Pip puts himself above other people and thinks very highly of himself, and the fact he is a gentleman. The readers view of Magwitch changes dramatically between chapter 1 and chapter 39. In chapter 1 the readers opinion of him is that he is ruthless, threatening and desperate because of how he acts with Pip, "Tell us your name!", "give it mouth"" and darn me if I could eat 'em". ...read more.

Conclusion

Dickens uses the scene and atmosphere to effect us as readers, using pathetic fallacy to create tension and a build up to the climax of a scene. In chapter 1 and chapter 39 Dickens uses his techniques to create what he wants to create, which is tension and sympathy towards the individuals of his choice. He keeps the reader surprised, as in chapter one Magwitch's emergence wasn't expected and his emergence wasn't expected in chapter 39 either, the way Dickens plays off another story of Miss Havisham being Pips benefactor for him to be worthy to marry Estella keeps the reader off any trail that Magwitch is involved furthermore in the story. The novel was so popular at the time is was written because it was believable and reflects reality of that time, so its like a drama or a telling or someone's actual life, but in the 21st century its not believable but still very popular and is still considered one of Dickens most sophisticated and greatest novels, because of the language and techniques used through out, keeping the reader interesting all the way through and having surprising twists to the plot. Great expectations is a successful novel, with chapter one and chapter 39 being the two most important and having the most authority of the whole story, with chapter one introducing the reader to the twist and chapter 39 revealing it. Chloe Jackson ...read more.

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