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Havisham and Anne Hathaway

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Introduction

Poetry Comparison Havisham and Anne Hathaway By Carol Ann Duffy The poems Havisham and Anne Hathaway by Carol Ann Duffy are about the personal relationships between couples; the former has a relationship which has been entirely destroyed and has swung into the prospect of hatred and resentment, the latter is about a relationship in which the married couple are 'head over heels in love' for each other. In Havisham, the speaker is the literary character Miss Havisham, from the novel Great Expectations by Charles Dickens. In the novel, Miss Havisham is a depicted as a wealthy spinster, who was left at the altar at her marriage by a man named Compeyson, and this poem by Carol Ann Duffy is an attempt to draw out the thoughts of Miss Havisham. The second poem is about the love between William Shakespeare, the famous English poet and playwright, and Anne Hathaway, his beloved wife, who is a real person unlike Miss Havisham, but once more the poem is an attempt to draw out the thoughts of Anne Hathaway. In terms of the happiness between the couple, it is the total opposite of the relationship in Havisham. In the first stanza of Havisham, we can see her true hatred of Compeyson, the man she was to marry, and how the emotional impact on her mind has made an effect on her physical appearance. ...read more.

Middle

The second sentence in the poem Anne Hathaway is filled with more romance and happiness, and the speaker, Anne Hathaway, uses incorporates grammar into a type of word play, as some form of sexual communication with William Shakespeare. 'My lover's words...as kisses on these lips,' once again the idea of a microcosm is used, and the metaphors 'of shooting stars which fell to earth' make their love seem most amazing. 'My body...now echo, assonance,' this way of incorporating grammatical words into the sentence shows the compatibility between the two lovers, and could also be thought of as a way to entice her lover. This world play is carried on within the poem reinforce the idea of compatibility between Anne Hathaway and Shakespeare, as well as her methods of arousing Shakespeare, with him being a playwright. Carol Ann Duffy puts in various senses for us to get a better feel for the passion in this relationship. As we can see, the relationship between Hathaway and Shakespeare is vividly strong and truly passionate, whereas the relationship between Miss Havisham and Compeyson has decayed away and is the complete contrary to the former relationship. The third stanza of the poem Havisham begins with more feeling of decay and continues with a dream or recollection that the speaker has. This stanza also brings in the erotic element, as Miss Havisham, before she was left at the altar, was in deep and true love with this man, Compeyson. ...read more.

Conclusion

'Bang. I stabbed at a wedding cake,' this is to show her frightening and manic behaviour, all due to the emotional breakdown of her wedding day. 'Give me...slow honeymoon,' this portrays a malicious quality in her character, as if she has become evil herself now. In the final sentence, the idea of decay is brought back when the speech itself breaks down in the ultimate word. This stanza clearly shows the malice of Miss Havisham and how frightening she can be. The closing sentence of the poem Anne Hathaway states: 'My living laughing love...that next best bed.' The alliteration at the beginning of the 'l' sound creates energy in the poem. The last two lines are reciprocals of each other, as at first it is Shakespeare who holds Hathaway in their bed, but then it is Hathaway who holds Shakespeare in the precious casket. Although the two are separated, by death, there seems to be no sadness in the sentence, and possibly because the love they shared when they were both alive still lives on inside them, as their love was so remarkable. From this analysis, we can see that the two relationships depicted in the two poems are extremely different; one is packed with misery and anger, and the speaker is manic and also in a state of decay, the other is full of love and romance, and the speaker is joyous of the exciting relationship that she is so fortunate to be part of. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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