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How and why does Elizabeth's opinion change of Darcy in Chapter 43?

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How and why does Elizabeth's opinion change of Darcy in Chapter 43? Plan * Basic description of Chapter 43. * Elizabeth's past feelings towards Darcy. * What happens to change her feelings? * Her feelings towards the end of the Chapter. Elizabeth visits Pemberly, whilst staying at her aunt and uncles house, the Gardiner's. She travels there with confused and mixed feelings toward Darcy. She is unsure on the truth about his and Mr Wickhams misfortunes. Earlier Mr Darcy declared his love for her and asked her to marry him. At that time she declined, believing he was a proud and rude man. She has now learnt that he is a proud man, but also a loving and generous man too. This is shown by what she hears about him throughout the day. However much she wants to believe Darcy, she is still somewhat shocked about the letter she received from him whilst staying at the Collins'. (Chapter 35) ...read more.


His friendly and hospitable manner is warmly praised by the Gardiener's but Lizzie, is nervous and embarrassed on meeting him. She doesn't want him to judge her on her mysterious visit to Pemberly, but he is calm and unaffected by the company. Generally he seems pleased that they are there. Elizabeth introduces her Aunt and Uncle, she is happy to show that some of her family are intelligent and sensible. Darcy shows no signs of his past arrogance; he even suggests that Elizabeth meets his younger sister Georgiana. Elizabeth is flattered by Darcy's kind gesture. He shows his gentlemanly behaviour; by offering Mr Gardiner to fish in his stream. A male gesture that shows he is trying to create a bond. At the beginning of the chapter Elizabeth is still prejudiced against Darcy. On seeing Pemberley, however, her opinion of him begins to change. She becomes enchanted by the amazing architecture and natural beauty of the grounds. 'Every disposition of the ground was good; and she looked on the whole scene, the river, the tree scattered on its banks, and the winding of the valley.' ...read more.


He is swallowing his pride just for her, and Elizabeth begins to see this. The Gardiners find the charming Darcy far from rude a disagreeable and insolent man, and believe that he could never do such a thing to harm someone, referring to the Darcy-Wickham scenario. With the Gardiners opinion of Darcy positive it is obvious the Lizzie is becoming less prejudice towards him and is even beginning to like him. By the end of their visit Elizabeth learns that Darcy is a proud man, but there is also more to him than that. People have misunderstood him, as his first impressions weren't that pleasing. Although he is an excellent master, a devoted brother and a generous landlord. He is a well-cultured and intelligent man, and Elizabeth is impressed by his taste and refinement of his home. It was Elizabeth's refusal of marriage that made him undergo this metamorphosis from a proud aristocrat to a kind down to earth person, and he has shown these signs through this chapter, all of his previous attempts toward Lizzie have been shown here again and, most importantly, Elizabeth has recognized them and accepted them. This is the beginning of their friendship. ...read more.

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