• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Dickens successfully link Magwitch's appearance in Chapter one with his return in Chapter Thirty-nine in "Great Expectations"

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Dickens successfully link Magwitch's appearance in Chapter one with his return in Chapter Thirty-nine in 'Great Expectations'? 'Great Expectations' is set in the 1800's, for gentlemen of that time, life was rich and full of beautiful houses and places. Because they didn't have to work they spent their days chatting, going to dinners and just having fun. But for the working class, they had to always be thinking of ways to make money and always working to secure their next meal. This novel was serialised, which meant that the story was published part by part and so, many groups of people would gather together to read the story. They could then tell each other what they thought was going to happen in the next couple of chapters. To make the audience want to read the next couple of chapters, Dickens had to end each chapter with a cliff hanger. The central protagonist in this novel is Pip. In the first chapter we learn that Pip's parents are dead and so he lives with his sister and her husband. ...read more.

Middle

He is in the graveyard looking at his parent's gravestone. This is shown by Pip thinking about what his parents looked like. 'As I never saw my father or mother', this comment shows that Pip is not only physically alone but also spiritually alone as he had never really known his parents. The fact that Pip is alone ties in with the beginning of Chapter Thirty-nine when he is alone also. 'I was alone, and had a dull sense of being alone'. This shows that Pip is still even years after he had become a gentleman and had lived this lavish lifestyle, was still physically and emotionally alone. He needs someone or something to make him feel less lonely. In Chapter One and Chapter Thirty-nine, Pip's world is turned upside down by Magwitch's appearance. In Chapter Thirty-nine Pip's world was literally turned upside down, 'I was the steeple under my feet'. Yet in Chapter Thirty-nine Pip's world is metaphorically turned upside down by Magwitch, when he reveals that he has been Pip's benefactor for all these years. ...read more.

Conclusion

Magwitch has a completely different react ion the first time he meets Pip to the second. The first time he meets Pip in Chapter One, he wants Pip to feel scared and intimidated of him so he says things and gestures at Pip in a frightening manner. For example as he says something to Pip he scares Pip with a, 'threatening shake of his head'. In Chapter Thirty-nine Magwitch is extremely pleased to see Pip again as he has news to tell him. He is courteous to Pip and is not scary and threatening like he was in the churchyard. '"yes", he replied, "I wish to come in, master"', Magwitch says to Pip when he arrives at Pip's door. The return of Magwitch in Chapter Thirty-nine will shock the reader but will also keep the suspense of the story going. The reader will not expect Magwitch to return and will most certainly be wondering how Magwitch is going to bed involved in the story further. Morally Dickens was trying to teach Pip and everyone reading the book that it is only right to help someone who has helped you even if it costs you as much as your livelihood. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Great Expectations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Great Expectations essays

  1. An evaluation of the effectiveness of chapter one of great expectations as the opening ...

    In this sentence Dickens also uses words that describe many different types of physical injury, in example - lamed, cut, stung, torn. This makes us think about how much suffering the man has been through, experiencing many types of physical pain.

  2. Great Expectations Role of Magwitch

    This quote uses both alliteration with the repetition on the, but also the pattern of three as Dicken's uses three different adjectives to describe how Pip is feeling. This quote shows that Pip is overcome with emotion and he begins to find it hard to breath.

  1. An exploration of the ways in which issues of class and status are presented ...

    but he brought his daughter up as if she were a Baroness. Pretentiously, she feels that she has married beneath her in marrying someone from the middle classes in Matthew, when she herself can be seen as middle class. She keeps dropping her handkerchief, has unruly children, suffers financial difficulties,

  2. How does Dickens create an effective opening chapter in Great expectations?

    This could be trying to show the audience that you should not judge people by class or appearance which is relevant later on in the story as the convict turns out to be a nice person of lower class while Estella is cruel and snobby because she thinks she is

  1. great expectations Chapter 8

    And my terror was greatest of all when I found no figure there' Dickens creates a really strong sense of mystery and this keeps us reading to find out what happens next. The final theme is the characters I will be investigating the three most important and interesting characters in Great Expectations.

  2. How does chapter 8 prepare the reader for the novel to follow?prose coursework: great ...

    He is also rather gullible and really believes that a terrible second man will tear his liver out when he sleeps unless he does as he has been told. This gullibility can be seen again when he visits Miss Havisham's house and is taken in by the charms of Estella.

  1. Analysing and explaining Charles Dickens' Great Expectations; Chapter 1.

    This creates tension in the atmosphere because it shows how big, tough, mad and powerful the convict is, in comparison and contrast to Pip, who's clearly t this point speechless, and shown as a paralysed, vulnerable, weak and inevitable small and defenceless.

  2. Great Expectations Chapter One analysis

    We sympathise for Magwitch as he was an orphan, just like Pip, and was in poverty throughout his life. We know this when Magwitch describes his life as "Tramping, begging, thieving, working sometimes" pointing towards being poor and as a result of poverty he was "In jail and out of jail, in jail and out of jail..."

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work