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How does Dickens successfully link Magwitch's appearance in Chapter one with his return in Chapter Thirty-nine in "Great Expectations"

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Introduction

How does Dickens successfully link Magwitch's appearance in Chapter one with his return in Chapter Thirty-nine in 'Great Expectations'? 'Great Expectations' is set in the 1800's, for gentlemen of that time, life was rich and full of beautiful houses and places. Because they didn't have to work they spent their days chatting, going to dinners and just having fun. But for the working class, they had to always be thinking of ways to make money and always working to secure their next meal. This novel was serialised, which meant that the story was published part by part and so, many groups of people would gather together to read the story. They could then tell each other what they thought was going to happen in the next couple of chapters. To make the audience want to read the next couple of chapters, Dickens had to end each chapter with a cliff hanger. The central protagonist in this novel is Pip. In the first chapter we learn that Pip's parents are dead and so he lives with his sister and her husband. ...read more.

Middle

He is in the graveyard looking at his parent's gravestone. This is shown by Pip thinking about what his parents looked like. 'As I never saw my father or mother', this comment shows that Pip is not only physically alone but also spiritually alone as he had never really known his parents. The fact that Pip is alone ties in with the beginning of Chapter Thirty-nine when he is alone also. 'I was alone, and had a dull sense of being alone'. This shows that Pip is still even years after he had become a gentleman and had lived this lavish lifestyle, was still physically and emotionally alone. He needs someone or something to make him feel less lonely. In Chapter One and Chapter Thirty-nine, Pip's world is turned upside down by Magwitch's appearance. In Chapter Thirty-nine Pip's world was literally turned upside down, 'I was the steeple under my feet'. Yet in Chapter Thirty-nine Pip's world is metaphorically turned upside down by Magwitch, when he reveals that he has been Pip's benefactor for all these years. ...read more.

Conclusion

Magwitch has a completely different react ion the first time he meets Pip to the second. The first time he meets Pip in Chapter One, he wants Pip to feel scared and intimidated of him so he says things and gestures at Pip in a frightening manner. For example as he says something to Pip he scares Pip with a, 'threatening shake of his head'. In Chapter Thirty-nine Magwitch is extremely pleased to see Pip again as he has news to tell him. He is courteous to Pip and is not scary and threatening like he was in the churchyard. '"yes", he replied, "I wish to come in, master"', Magwitch says to Pip when he arrives at Pip's door. The return of Magwitch in Chapter Thirty-nine will shock the reader but will also keep the suspense of the story going. The reader will not expect Magwitch to return and will most certainly be wondering how Magwitch is going to bed involved in the story further. Morally Dickens was trying to teach Pip and everyone reading the book that it is only right to help someone who has helped you even if it costs you as much as your livelihood. ...read more.

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