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HOW DOES EMILY BRONTE USE LANGUAGE TO CONTRAST SETTING AND ATMOSPHERE IN WUTHERING HEIGHTS?

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Introduction

HOW DOES EMILY BRONTE USE LANGUAGE TO CONTRAST SETTING AND ATMOSPHERE IN WUTHERING HEIGHTS? The famous novel by Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights, was written in the 1840's. At this time society was very biased towards the upper classes. There were four social classes, these were Nobility and Gentry, Middle class, Upper working class and last of all lower working class. Men were looked upon as being more important at this time in history. Men owned their land, their money and their wives. The industrial revolution played a large part in the reason for writing this book. Towns and cities were springing up all over the country, wildlife was being destroyed and Bronte disagreed with this. Let us look first of all on the names of the two dwellings. The first house is called 'Wuthering Heights'. The word 'Wuthering' suggests that the place the house is situated in is very windy. The next word, 'heights', insinuates that the house is on a hill or a cliff top. Whilst the name Thrushcross Grange makes the reader think of nice things, such as a delicate, small bird, a 'thrush', the next part of the word, 'cross' infers that this is a religious household and so are its inhabitants. ...read more.

Middle

The words 'huge liver coloured' infer again like Wuthering Heights that this is a violent and large household. The furniture in Wuthering Heights is showed as being bland and uninteresting. The chairs in front of the fire are 'primitive' which means that there is nothing at all fancy about them. This shows that the house is not a very welcoming place, and that visitors would be unlikely to feel at home when inside the property. In stark contrast, the furniture in Thrushcross Grange is completely different; it is more for show than practicality. It is elegant, soft and civilised. The furnishings in Thrushcross Grange are evidently of a much higher standard than that of in Wuthering heights. The ceiling is described as being a 'pure white'. The word pure suggests that it is perfect in every way possible, just like the house. Another vast difference between the two dwellings is the food. In Wuthering Heights the food is much more for surviving than entertainment. In the novel, Lockwood tells us that he 'distinguished a chatter of tongues and clatter of culinary utensils deep within'. Another quote which supports this is 'and I observed no signs of roasting, boiling, or baking, about the huge fireplace; nor any glitter of copper saucepans and tin colanders on the walls'. ...read more.

Conclusion

They accuse him of being a criminal even thought they have no evidence at all that he is. When Cathy is bitten they don't care at all about her health but once they find out that she is in the same social class as them they take her inside and treat her wounds. They Linton children are spoilt an example of this is when they are fighting over who gets to hold the dog. As Cathy and Heathcliff peer in through the window they laugh. They would love to have a dog to play with and share and find it pathetic these two children are fighting over and hurting the dog. Overall the two households may seem very different on the face of it like the people they are in many ways almost identical. Both sets of people can be ignorant, unwelcoming and uncaring. Whilst their hobbies and habits are completely different they set the same priorities and goals. I think in this novel Emily Bronte wants us to think about how we are all equal, despite the different circumstances in which we live. To contrast setting and atmosphere in Wuthering Heights, Emily Bronte uses highly dramatic language, causing the reader to visualise both the houses and the people extremely vividly. By Conor Brennan. ...read more.

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