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How does Jane Austen present love and marriage in " Pride and Prejudice"

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Introduction

How does Jane Austen present love and marriage in " Pride and Prejudice"? Jane Austen presents love and marriage in many ways in the novel Pride and Prejudice. In this essay I am going to discuss some of these marriages, not only from Jane Austen's portrayl of her characters but from my own point of view as well. Jane Austen opens Pride and Prejudice with a statement. It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must want be in want of a wife. By using this statement as her opening line she makes it very clear that she is humoured by the idea that every young an who has a large sum of money are eagerly looking for a wife. The main part of her book is based on matrimony. The statement shows clearly that she feels money and marriage are somewhat closely connected. Jane Austen expresses several relationships in the novel. Some of these happen to be successful, but on the other hand some don't. By expressing the successful and unsuccessful relationships between the characters, it makes the reader question what the necessities are for a successful and loving relationship. In this essay I am going to discuss how Jane Austen distinguishes each relationship in a very different way from another. Jane Austen presents Mr and Mrs Bennet's marriage as highly unsuccessful. ...read more.

Middle

She breathlessly answers Mr Bennet's questions revealing to the reader that the man is called Mr Charles Bingley and what a fine thing he would be for one of the girls he would be. Mr Bennet knowing his wife's ways only too well after twenty-three long hard years chooses to ridicule her in front of her daughters. He answers her in such a manner that infuriates her greatly. He refuses to accept Mrs Bennet's wishes of him going to pay Mr Bingley a visit when he arrives in the neighbourhood. Shocked at this refusal, she asks him to think of his daughters' future, as she believes that Mr Bingley would be perfect for one of them. Mr Bennet uses strong sarcasm as a reply to Mrs Bennet as he knows it will certainly infuriate her even more, explaining that if Mr Bingley were to meet with his daughters, he may favour Mrs Bennet over them all! ".. For you are as handsome as any of them, Mr Bingley might like you the best of the party." Surely, with Mrs Bennet being the mother of five grown up daughters, she should now be well past the stage of her own beauty! My final point about Mr and Mrs Bennet's marriage is that they don't seem to enjoy sharing each other's company. In awkward situations of his paternal and marital responsibilities he simply retreats back to his library in a hope to avoid all the fuss. ...read more.

Conclusion

She says herself that she is not a romantic person. At the Merryton assembly, she says to Elizabeth: " Happiness in a marriage is entirely a matter of chance and that therefore long acquaintanceship beforehand is not needed. " As she believes that people grow apart after marriage, she says " It is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person of whom you are to pass your life." When she states this to her good friend Elizabeth, she is enlightened to hear that Elizabeth feels she is joking. The marriage to Mr Collins proves just how wrong Elizabeth was. Charlotte is not joking at all and discovers ways which keep Mr Collins as occupied as possible for as long as possible ensuring that she doesn't have to spend much of her free time with him. She encourages him in gardening most days and gives him the best sitting room in the house hoping that he spends a lot of his time in there. Their marriage is highly unsuccessful relationship purely because they have no love for one another. In a way they have both achieved what they want but on the terms of how successful the marriage is, it doesn't fit the criteria too well. Elizabeth and Mr Darcy's relationship thankfully ends up as success. Their relationship does not begin all that well as Mr Darcy seems more bothered about Elizabeth's family importance and makes a quick judgement on her instead of her own qualities. Elizabeth feels disgusted and hurt when ...read more.

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