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How does Mary Shelley manipulate you response to the characters of Frankenstein and his monster as the story develops?

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Introduction

Frankenstein How does Mary Shelley manipulate you response to the characters of Frankenstein and his monster as the story develops? The opening paragraph sets the scene for the story. It does this from the start when it begins with. 'a dreary night in November.' This creates a sense of winter with connotations of coldness, darkness and a time of death. It's also a classic setting for a horror novel. The word 'dreary' I think is an effective adjective and creates a clear sense of the miserable atmosphere. Another effective line is 'It was already one in the morning' This shows that it is night time which is the time of the supernatural. It also says. 'the rain pattered dismally against the panes' The word dismally is an effective adverb and creates a sense of the atmosphere being wet, lifeless and unpleasant. From all this I can see that the opening paragraph uses a number of generic conventions of horror novels. Frankenstein narrates Chapter Five we see all of the events through his eyes. We are not encouraged to feel sympathy for the monster, because Frankenstein directs our response. He Describes his creation as a 'thing' a 'catastrophe' a 'Wretch' and a 'Demoniacal corpse'. ...read more.

Middle

Winter is a negative time for the monster because the family he has been watching, helping and hoping to eventually gain friendship from have rejected him. All of his hopes are dashed. As a consequence instead of the love he was longing to feel, he experiences hatred and violence instead. At this point of the story I feel sympathy for the monster and am quite angry to society's reaction he is judged by his appearance rather than his personality. I can understand why Felix reacts how he does lets just look from his point of view. He walks into the house and sees a huge man at his father's knees and instinctively feels that his father is being threatened and in grave danger. So it was just natural to protect him. In Chapter Sixteen the monster's behaviour changes quite a bit. At the start of the chapter the monster is angry after being rejected by the family. 'my feelings were those of rage and revenge. I could with pleasure have destroyed the cottage and it's inhabitants.' He also began to despise man. 'from that moment on I declared everlasting war against the species.' Then his behaviour changed again and was being cheered up by the spring weather. ...read more.

Conclusion

At the end of the novel I feel more sympathy for the monster than Frankenstein. This is because all of the misery and despair he has suffered he has brought upon himself. But in the case of the monster he was brought into this world and has had no choice in the matter. His whole existence has been one of rejection. Rejection from his father, the family and the whole of mankind and the only chance of him being happy in his life was taken away from him by his own father. I don't agree with Frankenstein's assessment of the monster that. 'He's soul is as hellish as his form, full of treachery and fiendlike malice' I would interpret him as intelligent, misunderstood and vulnerable. Giving the monster a name would give him an identity and therefore wouldn't have the same scary, mysterious effect on the reader. Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein in 1818. I think that the book still appeals to a modern audience because prejudice still exists in our society so it's a universal theme. It deals with the danger of scientific advance which is still an issue today for example, genetically modified foods or human cloning. It is a well-written horror story. Horror is still a very popular genre in literature and film with the recent, 'Goosebumps' series for children and popular horror films like the 'Halloween' films and 'Hellraiser'. ...read more.

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