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How does Mary Shelley present the monster during this story? How do we feel about him at the end of the novel?

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Introduction

How does Mary Shelley present the monster during this story? How do we feel about him at the end of the novel? Throughout my essay, I am going to explain and show the ways and techniques that Mary Shelley uses to present the monster through the novel. I will also describe how wee feel about the monster at various stages in the novel, and how our views and understanding of him may have changed. I will begin with a brief introduction to Mary Shelley herself, and how she was brought up, as I think this has had a big influence on her writing in 'Frankenstein'. Mary Shelley was brought up by her father since the age of around just ten days old. Her mother died just shortly after giving birth to Mary. I believe Mary Shelley blamed herself for her mothers death, and writing 'Frankenstein' was her way of letting out and incorporating her misery and hate through the characters in the book. I think that she is referring to herself as the monster because he only had a father, and although I think Mary's father did love her, she was still missing something and I think she felt like she wanted to be loved. ...read more.

Middle

As he goes out into society, people react with hate immediately just because he looks different. I think a lot of people again can feel very sorry for the monster here because society hasn't changed a lot and people are still judged by the way they look today so readers can relate in a way, or at least understand how the monster is being treated. Mary Shelley uses a lot of emotive language to show how confused the monster is. He can't understand why people hate him and reject him when they have never even given him a chance to know him. Later on in the novel, towards the middle, the monster finds himself in the company of a family called the Delacy's. He becomes quite friendly with the old man, who happens to be blind, therefore is unable to judge the monster by his appearance. This is the first time the monster feels like he has been given a real chance, where someone has looked past the ugliness and seen the real person within the monster, and that is true. The old man takes a liking to the monster and talks to him. ...read more.

Conclusion

This point of view makes us feel sorry for the monster. Frankenstein's point of view. This view of the monster makes us feel more disgusted, but still we pity the monster because he is unwanted and unloved besides his appearance. Finally, Walton's point of view. I think Walton's point of view is really a contrast between Frankenstein's and the monsters views because although he is Frankenstein's friend and dislikes the monster for murdering Frankenstein's wife and brother, he also pity's him because he has not been brought up to learn right or wrong, so he thinks that its not his fault. The use of three points of view is very effective because it really helps you to decide your own point of view for yourself. To conclude my essay, I think that Mary Shelley has been very clever in her use of emotive language especially. I think she really shows us how the monster is feeling at all time during the novel, and this shows us his true character. I think our views change of him throughout the novel, but we will always have the slight sense of feeling sorry for him more than anything, even though he does murder. It was never his fault that he was hated and rejected and I think that's why we have such a strong feeling of understanding towards him. 1,570 words ...read more.

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