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How does Shakespeare convey the intensity of the new found love between Romeo and Juliet in Act 2 Scene 2?

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Introduction

How does Shakespeare convey the intensity of the new found love between Romeo and Juliet in Act 2 Scene 2? * How do different adaptations portray this? * Which version do you prefer and why? At the beginning of Act 2, Scene 2, Romeo climbs over the wall of the Capulet residence and into the orchard.This is a risk in itself as Montagues' are sworn enemies of Capulets', and if Romeo is discovered,he will surely be killed. Juliet reminds him of this later on, but he just replies, "Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye Than twenty of their swords!Look thou but sweet, And I am proof against their emnity." (Lines 71 - 73) So we learn that he is willing to give up his life if only Juliet would say she loved him. He also chose Juliet over his friends, as he left the group to see her. Romeo begins to speak of his love for Juliet when he sees her on the balcony of her room. Juliet does not know Romeo is below her balcony as she has too much on her mind. Romeo calls Juliet, "bright angel" (Line 26) and "winged messenger of heaven" which shows he thinks her of a goddess and also shows how intense his love is for her. Juliet begins to speak of Romeo and we learn that the fact Romeo is a Montague and that their families do not get on is the reason why she is unsure of their love,"Deny thy father, and refuse thy name." ...read more.

Middle

(Line 139) The music becomes more upbeat but returns to the main tune when Juliet returns. When Juliet calls him back, she laughs and confesses she can't remember why she called.He soon jumps up the tree again and Juliet leans far over the balcony to kiss him. When Romeo must go, Juliet carefully lowers him down to the ground with a closeup of their hands gripping firmly and eventually letting go. She confesses,"Parting is such sweet sorrow." (Line 184) directly to his face. At the end of the scene, the camera draws back to see both characters go their seperate ways,both looking back longingly. Act 2, Scene 2 in the Baz Luhrman adaptation is completely different to that of Zeffirelli's. The scene opens also with the tune that was heard during the ball. This also creates a peaceful and romantic atmosphere and the fairylights add to this. The actors speak with American accents and both actors look about 18. The scene is set in a dark courtyard with only the fairylights as light. There is a large staircase, an elevator between floors and a swimming pool.These actors deliver their lines with good intonation so it sounds more like natural speech. The setting is more visually engaging with a distinct sense of danger in the air. Most of Romeo's speech is cut at the beginning, leaving him with two or three lines. We see Romeo entering the courtyard in the dark,but he unfortunately trips over some pots creating a loud bang. ...read more.

Conclusion

"Parting is such sweet sorrow." (Line 184) is said by Juliet to herself on her balcony with a sigh after Romeo has left. The camera zooms out to see the window of a room, with the shadow of the Nurse screaming her name, and taking a spasm at the same time, which is quite funny. A new, upbeat tune leads into the next scene. Overall, we got the impression that the pair could be caught any minute. The tension was sustained throughout the scene. Personally I think the Baz Luhrman adaptation shows the intensity of Romeo and Juliet's new found love the best. I felt his film portrayed it in a way much more relevant to the 20th century and was easier to understand. The scene was more realistic and more engaging than the Zeffirelli film. I felt the humour added in with Romeo making a racket and the Nurse at the end, made the scene more enjoyable. I, as the audience, felt involved in the film as I knew Romeo was on the trellis and Juliet didn't. The near miss with the guard had my class holding their breath hoping no harm would come to the pair. Even though a lot of the text was cut out, the story still shone through and I feel this was perhaps better as the scene did not drag on like Zeffirelli's. I thought the intonation in Baz Luhrman's made the scene come to life and did not sound like actors reciting lines. I feel that people of my age may be inclined to read more Shakespeare after viewing this film, as it was more relevant to today's society. ...read more.

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