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How does Shakespeare explore jealousy in Othello?

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How does Shakespeare explore jealousy in Othello? Is Iago jealous of Othello and his relationship with Desdemona? He definitely hates him for something. Is Othello jealous of Cassio's good looks etc? Is this what makes him crazy? Roderigo talking of Othello - 'What a full fortune does the thick lips owe, if he can carry't thus!' 'What a lucky nigger he is, getting away with that' Iago, by referring to Cassio as a 'counter-caster' is expressing his contempt and jealousy at not being promoted and continuing to work as Othello's 'ancient' (ensign). 'Jealousy is a sign of weakness in love, not of strength; it takes its source in fear, guilt and hate, rather than in love.' 'There is no love without jealousy; and jealousy is a measure of intense love. Its opposite is indifference.' In act five, scene one, when Roderigo stabs Cassio, Othello displays his sexual jealousy Iago on jealousy - 'O beware, my lord, of jealousy! ...read more.


No father has ever expressed a more hateful jealousy of his son-in-law. [Scene Summary] In a soliloquy at the end of the first scene in Cyprus, Iago speaks of his own motivations. He says of Desdemona, "Now, I do love her too; / Not out of absolute lust, though peradventure / I stand accountant for as great a sin, / But partly led to diet [feed] my revenge" (2.1.291-294). He wants revenge for his own suspicion that Othello has gone to bed with Emilia. It's eating at his gut and he won't be satisfied "Till I am even'd with him, wife for wife, / Or failing so, yet that I put the Moor / At least into a jealousy so strong / That judgement [reason] cannot cure" (2.1.299-302). The phrase "even'd with him, wife for wife," seems to mean that he has some notion that he might have sex with Desdemona, but it's not the sex that's important. Othello must feel that same poisonous jealousy that Iago feels. ...read more.


He intends to create a strong sense of jealousy in Othello by setting up the mirage of an affair between Desdemona and Cassio. Jealousy 5: Iago plants seeds of jealousy in Othello and then speaks of the 'green-eyed monster' as a force to be feared. Jealousy is personified as a monster. Jealousy 6: When Iago tells Othello of the handkerchief, he has the evidence necessary to prove Desdemona's unfaithfulness. It is now that the jealousy sinks deep into Othello's soul and starts to vividly destroy his psyche. Jealousy 7: Bianca, Cassio's common lover, also becomes sick with jealousy. She sees the planted handkerchief in Cassio's room and believes him to also have taken a lover. Her jealousy exists on a much smaller scale, but illustrates that the sentiment is universal. Jealousy 8: As the play concludes, all causes of jealousy are proved false. Desdemona was never unfaithful, but Othello realises the truth too late. Jealousy is the source of pain and death for these tragic characters; the green-eyed monster has succeeded in killing them. ...read more.

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