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How does Shakespeare's use of language successfully demonstrate Iago's destruction of Othello in Act 3 Scene 3 Othello is an black army general in the service of the Duke of Venice

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Introduction

How does Shakespeare's use of language successfully demonstrate Iago's destruction of Othello in Act 3 Scene 3 Othello is an black army general in the service of the Duke of Venice, and Iago, Othello's ensign, are both characters that Shakespeare created that effectively dominate the play. The relationship between these two characters is quite complex yet makes the play increasingly dramatic and interesting. To begin with Shakespeare presents Othello to the audience as being a very confidant and noble person. For example, in act 1, scene 2, when Iago informs Othello that Brabantio will try to break up the marriage of Othello and Desdemona, his response is that "my service which I have done the signiory shall out-tongue his complaints." This shows Othello is secure, confident and maybe even slightly arrogant. But he's also very controlled, self-assured and is presented by Shakespeare as being of a high status as he is informed by Cassio that he has "been hotly called for". Shakespeare also presents Othello as a calm and non-violent character as when he is accused by Brabantio of having "practised on her with foul charms," Othello replies in a very calm and rational manner that he will speak to the Duke about the matter. ...read more.

Middle

So one of the major differences that the audience would notice between Iago and Othello is that Iago does not believe in equality whereas Othello does. In order to introduce the first and main theme that will dominate the play, which is sexual jealousy, Shakespeare uses Iago. This is done during Iago's soliloquy where he revels that "After some time, to abuse Othello's ear that he is too familiar with his wife." The significance of this is that Iago is the reason Othello begins to doubt his wife. Therefore Shakespeare is making the audience aware of who the real villain is and who the victim is. But Act 3, scene 3, is a very crucial scene as it is where Shakespeare begins to show the audience the changes that are occurring in the relationship between Othello and Iago, and how they are affecting both the characters. This scene begins with Desdemona informing Cassio that she will do her best to convince Othello to give Cassio his job back. But as soon as Othello arrives, Cassio departures. The reason for this may have been the fact that he felt ashamed of what had happened that caused him to lose his job. ...read more.

Conclusion

At this point we also see a different side to Othello as he begins to show his anger and threatens Iago to "Give ocular proof...' or '...answer my wicked wrath!" The audience now begins to see the affect Iago is having on Othello. When Othello says "Nay stay, thou shouldst be honest," Shakespeare presents him in a state of confusion. This would arise a state of sympathy from the audience towards Othello. Furthermore, Iago begins to manipulate Othello's mind as he forces him to create the visual image in his mind of Desdemona "topped." His response to this is "Death and damnation! O!" This once again implies that Iago is succeeding in ruining Othello life. Shakespeare presents their relationship as being very awkward as Othello trusts and respects Iago's honesty, but this for Othello is unrequited. Iago begins to explain to Othello that he should believe what he is saying as it is impossible to see Desdemona in that situation. But Othello still insists that Iago gives him "a living reason she's disloyal." But by this point it is too late, Iago had already destroyed Othello. Othello doubts everyone except Iago and when Iago sell the story of Cassio dreaming of Desdemona to Othello, we the audience realise it is too late. ?? ?? ?? ?? Shaymas Hussain 08/05/2007 ...read more.

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