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How does Shakespeare show the changing relationship between Juliet and her parents in Act 3 Scene 5?

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Introduction

How does Shakespeare show the changing relationship between Juliet and her parents in Act 3 Scene 5? At the beginning of this scene, Juliet behaves just as a typical child would, during the time that the play was set. Her relationship with her parents is based generally on obedience and respect. Children would often try to satisfy their parents, and do what they wanted them to do, compared to modern times where children are very often a lot less obedient. The nurse plays an important role for Juliet - that of a mothering figure. Juliet is a lot closer to the nurse than she is to her parents and feels she can trust her - In act 2, Juliet sends the nurse, as a messenger, to her love Romeo. ...read more.

Middle

What, wilt thou wash him from his grave with tears? And if thou could'st, thou could'st not make him live; Therefore have done: some grief shows much of love, But much of grief shows still some want wit." This also indicates that Lady Capulet is unable to comfort her daughter. This is because she is unaware how to, as she has never been in this situation before. It also shows how people in the time of the play were not encouraged to show their feelings about such situations. This is also an example of dramatic irony. Lady Capulet believes Juliet is upset because of the death of Tybalt, but the audience knows it is because of Romeo's 'expulsion'. ...read more.

Conclusion

In Act 1 Scene 3, Juliet displayed her naivety and obedience: when Lady Capulet asked her about how she felt about marriage, Juliet replied with - "It is an honour I dream not of." This shows us that not only has she not considered marriage, but also would consider it an honour to marry at her mother's wish. Again Juliet uses ambiguity to show us how she feels about Romeo "I will not marry yet; and when I do, I swear It shall be Romeo, whom you know I hate, Rather than Paris. These are news indeed!" This again is dramatic irony, because Lady Capulet believes that Juliet hates Romeo. Juliet's disobedience is a great shock to Lady Capulet. This has put her in a petulant mood with Juliet, and so she hands the difficult situation over to her husband, Capulet - "Here comes your father; tell him so yourself," ...read more.

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