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How does Stephen Fry set out to persuade his audience that history is important?

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Introduction

How does Stephen Fry set out to persuade his audience that history is important? Stephen Fry starts off his argument by generalizing what comes up in a conversation when history is discussed but goes straight in to attack and crush it by pointing out why it is useful using a rhetorical question. He then uses a short sentence, "History is bunk", for impact and to convey the general view to the audience. ...read more.

Middle

He questions what history really is and if it is useful nowadays only as a politically correct lesson and this gets the audience thinking for themselves rather than just reading the article. He uses the word "we" to express shared values and to familiarize himself with the audience and repeats the use of a rhetorical question to keep the audience always on his side and always thinking. He disarms the other side of the argument by saying that history still continues to surpass expectations. ...read more.

Conclusion

He uses lots of adjectives to describe history such as "thrilling" and "fascinating" to persuade the audience that it is still important and calls the audience "you" to make himself acquainted with the audience. He then disarms another argument that he brought up earlier in the article. This argument being about that it is not the political correctness that "dogs" history but the rejection to imagine our ancestors. He goes on to uses a third rhetorical question and concludes by indicating that history is actually what it was like to be in our ancestors shoes. ?? ?? ?? ?? Tom Odgers ...read more.

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