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How effectively do Pip's reactions to his first visit to London in chapter 20 of Great Expectations reveal Dickens' own views on Victorian society? Use quotations and refer to the language and tone to make your points.

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Introduction

English coursework How effectively do Pip's reactions to his first visit to London in chapter 20 of Great Expectations reveal Dickens' own views on Victorian society? Use quotations and refer to the language and tone to make your points. Introduction In this piece of coursework I will be focusing on Great Expectations by Charles Dickens'. In this book it covers the rapid affects of visiting London for the first time on Pip's (The main character) life. Pip who grew up in a small village realized that it would be difficult for him to become a gentleman there. His ambitions were to become a gentleman in order to impress the beautiful young Estella who spent a lot of time with Miss. ...read more.

Middle

To prepare Pip for this job Mr. Jaggers gives Pip money to buy new clothes and says "there is already lodged in my hands a sum of money amply sufficient for your suitable education and maintenance" (Page 136). This money helped Pip to move to London in order to improve his life. This shows that Dickens view is that he felt wealth makes life easier and poverty makes life miserable. Dickens' initially describes London as a 'metropolis' (meaning a big city). The impression that this description has on Pip is making him feel very scared of "the immensity of London". ...read more.

Conclusion

Dickens' in this opening uses irony by describing London as 'ugly, crooked, narrow and dirty', but highlighting the fact that the 'Britons' felt that it was wrong to even think that London was the best of all of these things. This irony shows that Dickens' does not believe that London or Britain is perfect. That London has positive aspects and negative aspects. Mr. Jagger's office is described by the narrative voice as 'dismal', 'dreadful', and 'deadly'. The use of these words tells the reader Pip's view of the room was negative and found the room unbearable. Pip also describes the room as small, and containing odd objects like a rusty pistol, a sword in a scabbard, and casts of peculiar looking swollen faces. Dickens' views on this is that the lawyers or middle class are intimidators ...read more.

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