• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How far do the experiences of young Pip reflect the life of minors in nineteenth century life?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Bryony Hughes 10RSW English Coursework How far do the experiences of young Pip reflect the life of minors in nineteenth century life? The book 'Great Expectations' follows the life of Pip. Pip is a young boy living in the 19th century. Throughout the book we see the many changes in scenery in Pip's life, and how this changes him and the people around him. Pip is an orphan. At the beginning of the book, Pip encounters an escaped convict; this meeting changes his and the convict's life. Pip then inherits riches, from a mysterious benefactor, snobbishly abandons his friends for London society and 'Great Expectations,' and grows through misfortune and suffering to maturity. ...read more.

Middle

The man tells Pip that if he wants to live, he'll go down to his house and bring him back some food and a file for the shackle on his leg. Pip runs home to his sister, Mrs. Joe Gragery, and his adoptive father, Joe Gargery. Mrs. Joe is a loud, angry, nagging woman who constantly reminds Pip and her husband Joe of the difficulties she has gone through to raise Pip and take care of the house. Pip finds solace from these rages in Joe, who is more his equal than a paternal figure, and they are united under a common oppression. Pip steals food and a pork pie from the pantry shelf and a file from Joe's forge and brings them back to the escaped convict the next morning. ...read more.

Conclusion

Pip is insulted, but thinks there is something wrong with him. He vows to change, to become uncommon, and to become a gentleman. Pip continues to visit Estella and Miss Havisham for eight months and learns more about their strange life. Miss Havisham brings him into a great banquet hall where a table is set with food and large wedding cake. But the food and the cake are years old, untouched except by a vast array of rats, beetles and spiders which crawl freely through the room. Her relatives all come to see her on the same day of the year: her birthday and wedding day, the day when the cake was set out and the clocks were stopped many years before; i.e. the day Miss Havisham stopped living. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Great Expectations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work