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How Hardy represents Bathsheba and Fanny, and how he evokes sympathy for them

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Introduction

Far from the Madding Crowd. In this essay I would like to evaluate how Hardy represents Bathsheba ??and ?Fanny, and how he evokes sympathy for them. The plot of Far From the Madding crowd takes place in a fictional county known as Wessex, which is actually Dorset in the South West of England. In this novel, Hardy presents us with an accurate picture of the rural way of life, which was gradually being lost. It is set in 1840 and we are given an insight into the old farm workers communities, the customs of the countryside and the inherited wisdom and the knowledge of generations. I will start with Bathsheba, we learn that Bathsheba was a vain woman, "woman of Bathsheba's calibre" She was always aware of how she looked and of what other people thought of her. Bathsheba's vanity is clarified in the reader's first view of her, "she blushed at herself." She shows her selfish quality which creates vulnerability in her character, although she does not want anyone to be aware of this because she may feel that it makes her look weak or inadequate as an independent women, and farm owner. She was also a very independent woman who defined the preconceived idea of a woman's role in the 19th century by inheriting her uncle's farm, and was successful in running the farm effectively. ...read more.

Middle

This may also have relevant as to where she felt most comfortable, where she did not have to act or have to impress anyone. I think her surname shares a link to the real Bathsheba, the hardworking, independent, country girl, this is why she was so successful in the managing of her uncle's farm. It gave her a chance to unwind and clear her mind from all the turmoil that surrounded her constantly. Hardy is not the only person who tells us about Bathsheba. Other characters also make statements about her, "she is so good looking and an excellent scholar," we are told this by her aunt, she says this to try and stop Gabriel from proposing marriage to Bathsheba early in the book. Troy also tells us about Bathsheba as well, "I said you were beautiful and I'll say so still, by so you are." Troy says this to flatter her and to seduce her; unfortunately Bathsheba is weak in this sense and is easily flattered, so she falls for Troy. Although, in saying this, by the end of the novel she reveals an inner strength which is demonstrated by her being able to endure troy and Fanny being buried together and by her keeping Fanny's lock of hair as a momenta of the "poor girl." It is this inner strength which illuminates her need and love for Gabriel, who has remained true and loyal to her throughout her progress. ...read more.

Conclusion

With the character of Fanny Hardy was able to draw a lot more sympathy from the readers due to the reality of her character and that did happen in those days. Fanny was the total contrast to Bathsheba she was the shy and "dark and lonely figure" who was never paid any attention to; she was poor and weak. She was never, I think, truly happy with who she was and how people, especially Troy treated her and Troy only realised how special she was until it was too late. The most striking scene in the book was definitely when the gurgoyle was dripping water all over Fanny's grave and ruining it. This is when we as readers, we sit back and are made to think of the things in our life that we take for granted each day, just expecting them to always be there, and one day they wont and then we will truly realise how much we had loved them, as Troy found out when Fanny died. Hardy has presented these characters in the most appropriate and effective way in order to draw sympathy from them. I do think now, that this book is not just to be read but it has been written to make you think about the things that you cherish most in life, and don't make the mistake of not appreciating them. Andrew Kusiak 1022/10E This essay attained a A* ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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