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How is sympathy created for the monster in chapter V and chapter VII of Mary Shelly's Frankenstein?

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Introduction

How is sympathy created for the monster in chapter V and chapter VII of Mary Shelly's Frankenstein? Sympathy is created for the monster in chapter five and chapter seven in Mary Shelly's Frankenstein by using various techniques. In chapter V the reader learns about the creation and the initial birth of the monster through the eyes of the monsters creator, Victor Frankenstein. The reader feels empathy for Frankenstein by the way he describes the build up to the monster being given life. He tells us that: "I beheld the accomplishment of my toils" and "With an anxiety that almost accounted to agony, I collected the instruments of life around me" This shows the excitement and anxiety Frankenstein felt now that his years of research and work are coming to an end. The empathy the reader feels is increased when they read Frankenstein's reaction of the monsters birth, which he describes as a "catastrophe" and regards his creation as a breathless horror. Shelly uses contrast very effectively when describing the monster from Frankenstein's point of view. He describes the monster to have: "Teeth of pearly whiteness" and "hair of a lustrous black"" but he then states "these luxuriance's only formed a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes... ...read more.

Middle

Frankenstein's actions when the monster is created could be explained by the continuous repetition of the pronoun 'I'. This shows he is very self-absorbed and this could be the reason he does not sympathise with the monster. Chapter seven follows the monster, having been forced to flee Inglostadt, lives outside a cottage in the woods. He watches the De Lacey family, who are the residents of the cottage and learns from them. The narrative perspective has now shifted from Victor Frankenstein to the monster. From this perspective we discover how the monster begins to learn different aspects of human nature. He tells us that: "I learned from the views of social life which it developed, to admire their virtues and to deprecate the vices of mankind." He learns this from the De Lacey family as he learns how to read. The monster reads books, left by the De Lacey family, and realises a greater deal about him but raises many questions in his mind, which include "who was I?" "What was I?" and "Whence did I come?" He also believes his "person hideous" and "stature gigantic" and that he is "dependent on none" and "related to none." ...read more.

Conclusion

When the monster entered the cottage and began conversing with the old man he was interrupted by the rest of the family returning home who were shocked at the stranger in their house. Agatha fainted, Safie fled and Felix through the monster to the ground and beat him with a stick. At this moment the monsters "heart sunk" and was filled with "bitter sickness." At this point he fled to his hovel, next to the cottage, "overcome by pain and anguish" You feel great sympathy for the monster at this point because he has been rejected yet again by the only people he cared for and thought would accept him. Overall, Shelly uses many different ways of creating sympathy for the monster including detailed descriptions of the birth of the monster, which also incorporates the use of gothic images, the use of first person and a switch in narrative perspective. Shelly wanted the reader to sympathise with the monster because of the views and attitude to scientific research at that period of time, which she saw as dangerous and frightening. Also Shelley's personal views on parenting and personal responsibility contribute to her making the audience feel sympathy for the monster. The Rejection the monster feels relates to Shelley's own mother dying during childbirth. ...read more.

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