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How Shakespeare kept his audience interested in Act 2 scenes 1&2 and Act 3 scene 4 of Macbeth.

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Introduction

How Shakespeare kept his audience interested in Act 2 scenes 1&2 and Act 3 scene 4. In Shakespearean times, they did not have any sophisticated stage equipment such as lighting and impressive sound effects. Shakespeare had to resort to other ways of keeping the audience who came to see his plays interested and satisfied. Shakespeare had managed to find very good ways to do this. I have studied three scenes form one of Shakespeare's most famous plays, Macbeth. They were Act 2 Scene 1, Act 2 Scene 2 and Act 3 Scene 4. These scenes were put in this play for special reasons, as I will discuss later on in this essay. Act 2 Scene 1 is Macbeth's famous soliloquy. Act 2 Scene 2 is where Macbeth discuses his problems with his wife and Act 3 Scene 4 is where Macbeth hosts a banquet. In this essay I am going to explain in detail how Shakespeare managed to keep his audience interested in these three key scenes. ...read more.

Middle

Macbeth says in his soliloquy "I have thee not, and yet I see thee still" and "Mine eyes are made the fools o'th' other senses". The first quote was Macbeth talking to the dagger and the second quote was Macbeth speaking his thoughts out aloud. This is how Shakespeare used language to keep his audience satisfied. Another way Shakespeare kept is audience interested was with the use of good and innovative dramatic techniques. An example of a dramatic technique is irony. There were many new dramatic techniques introduced by Shakespeare in his play Macbeth, but I am going to concentrate and explain only the ones used in the 3 scenes which this essay is about. In my view the most effective technique was the use of the supernatural. There was a lot of the supernatural in the play Macbeth. That is one reason why it is so famous. The witches were the main supernatural characters in Macbeth. However, in these three scenes the supernatural was only introduce in Act 2 scene 1 (Macbeth's soliloquy) ...read more.

Conclusion

Using interesting characters, Shakespeare had managed to keep his audience happy. As I mentioned t the start of this essay, Shakespeare had a very good reason to include the 3 scenes mentioned. The main reason why he included these scenes was to make Macbeth seem guilty. This can clearly be seen in the three scenes. In his soliloquy, Macbeth sees an air drawn dagger, in Act 2 Scene 2, Macbeth talks to his wife about the voices he hears and how he has come to fear everything and in the banquet, he sees a ghost. These are all signs that Macbeth is in a state of overwhelming guilt and regret. The audience, after seeing these scenes, will start to doubt Macbeth's state of mind. These are the reasons why Shakespeare introduced these three scenes. Having a good purpose and plot will keep the audience interested. There were many ways with which Shakespeare kept his audience interested in his plays. The four main ones were, language and imagery, dramatic techniques, characters and purpose and plot. I have explained these in detail. Shakespeare had managed to put all these points into his writings and that's what made Macbeth such a good play. ...read more.

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