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In Act 1, Scene 7, How Does Shakespeare Effectively Show Lady Macbeth(TM)s Influence on Macbeth(TM)s Decisions and Actions?

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Introduction

In Act 1, Scene 7, How Does Shakespeare Effectively Show Lady Macbeth's Influence on Macbeth's Decisions and Actions? In this essay I will consider how Shakespeare effectively shows Lady Macbeth's influence on Macbeth's decisions and actions. The play was written in 1606, but set in around 1040, by a famous play writer called William Shakespeare. At the beginning, three witches arrange to meet Macbeth on the heath. Whilst this is happening, King Duncan awards Macbeth with Thane of Cawdor for his bravery and heroic acts in the recent battle. The story then moves on from a man happy with who he was, to a man obsessed with ambition. At the beginning of Act 1 Scene 7, Macbeth is delivering a soliloquy. He is under no influence from Lady Macbeth, therefore reflecting on his innermost feelings. He is saying what he believes to be morally sound, as he doesn't have anyone to lie to. He decides that he is not going to kill the king. It is important for the audience to see Macbeth's actions when he is not in Lady Macbeth's company. In this soliloquy, which is found in Act 1 scene 7, lines 1-28, Macbeth debates whether he should kill King Duncan. ...read more.

Middle

Macbeth is a very selfish character. We see this when he talks about life after death. When the play was set, everyone strongly believed in the after life. Heaven and Hell were accepted to be real destinations and actual places for the souls to go to after life. 'If th'assassination Could trammel up the consequence, and catch With his surcease, success; that but this blow, Might be the be-all and the end-all - here, But here, upon this bank and shoal of time, We'd jump the life to come' Macbeth is saying that he doesn't care any more about the life to come, and that if he becomes King, he will achieved all he wants to achieve in this life, and doesn't care where he ends up after death. If he gets away with murder in this life, he would risk going to Hell for it. As the soliloquy ends, Macbeth seems to resolve not to kill Duncan, but this resolve will only last until his wife returns and once again convinces him, by the strength of her will, to go ahead with their plot. Lady Macbeth then enters like a hurricane and blows his hesitant thoughts away. ...read more.

Conclusion

Act 1 Scene 7 is dominated by Lady Macbeth, who is probably the most memorable character in the play. Her violent soliloquies testify to her strength of will, and she understands that she will have to manipulate the person she married into acting on the witches' prophecy, and hence getting the power she is ambitious for. The plot of the play hinges on Macbeths betrayal of Duncan, and, ultimately, of Scotland. Just as Lady Macbeth will prove to be the opposite of the ideal wife, Macbeth proves to be a completely disloyal subject. In Act 1 Scene 7 for example, Macbeth talks about Duncan's many good qualities, reflects that Duncan has been kind to him, and thinks that perhaps he ought not to kill the King. This is Macbeth's first long soliloquy, and also the audience's first peek inside his mind. Both Macbeth and Lady Macbeth's soliloquies are very strong and powerful, but also very different at the same time. Macbeth's soliloquy is used to show the audience his innermost thoughts and deepest feelings, while Lady Macbeth's is used to influence Macbeth into doing the deed. She uses emotional blackmail by calling Macbeth a coward and insulting his manhood. Shakespeare uses both characters with great effect and chooses his language superbly. ...read more.

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