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In Act I Scene III Juliet portrays the ideal young woman; she is respectful and abides by her fathers wishes. However, In Act III Scene V Juliet attitude is changed by her love for Romeo.

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English Coursework In Act I Scene III Juliet portrays the ideal young woman; she is respectful and abides by her fathers wishes. However, In Act III Scene V Juliet attitude is changed by her love for Romeo. Romeo and Juliet is a dramatic 1500's play about two star crossed lovers. Two teenagers who pursue their love for each other despite the fact that their families have been at dispute for decades; the love which results in their death. In Act I Scene III Juliet speaks very little compared to the Nurse and Lady Capulet. In this scene Juliet exemplifies the perfect young woman of the Elizabethan period; she is obedient, dutiful and polite. In response to Lady Capulet's suggestion that Juliet falls in love with Paris Juliet replies with "I'll look to like, if looking liking move... But no more deep will I endart my eye." This response indicates that Juliet is very obedient, that she will look to love Paris because her parents want her to. It also shows the respect she has for her parents. That speech also shows how na�ve and innocent Juliet is to love and that she doesn't fully understand it. When Juliet speaks to her mother her obedience and courtesy is evident, "It is an honour that I dream not of" as Juliet uses the word "honour" it shows that she truly respects her parent's wishes. As Juliet doesn't speak that much in this scene and by the formal nature of her speech it shows that her status is lower than Lady Capulet's and maybe even the Nurse's as she looks to Nurse for support. ...read more.


young so in a way Juliet has replaced her, Nurse had brought Juliet up from a child so she sees her as a daughter figure. In Zefferelli's adaptation of the play he clearly shows that Juliet prefers Nurse's company than Lady Capulet's. In the scene Juliet is shown cuddling up to Nurse and sitting on her lap, also before Juliet speaks to Lady Capulet she sometimes looks to Nurse for support. When Lady Capulet calls for Juliet and wishes Nurse to leave to talk to Juliet privately, Juliet looks worried that Nurse had left and that she is left alone with her mother. In Act III Scene V Juliet behaviour is in complete contrast to how she acted in Act I Scene III. In the first part of the scene while she is with Romeo, Juliet uses happy, lively and poetic words. In the second part Juliet speaks aggressively towards her parents. In this scene there is a change in the language Juliet uses, "Yon light is not daylight... Therefore stay yet, thou need'st not to be gone" this sentence is a contrast from the balcony scene, where it was Juliet that was worried about Romeo being there, but now she is trying to persuade him to stay longer. The scene is very poetic showing her mature and passionate side. In Romeo and Juliet's relationship there is a sense of equality, and as Juliet is no longer innocent to love she speaks a lot more and speaks freely. ...read more.


"I think it is best you married with the County" Nurse is telling Juliet to marry Paris despite that Juliet loves Romeo. Juliet looked to Nurse for support after the fight with her parents, but only to feel betrayed when Nurse agrees with her parents. In this scene it is clear that there is a change in the relationship between Juliet and the Nurse, "Ancient damnation! O most wicked fiend!" Juliet is upset with Nurse for betraying her, Juliet feels all alone. The audience feel sympathy for Juliet at the end of this scene because Romeo has abandoned her, Nurse and her parents have betrayed her, now Juliet is completely alone. It is in contrast with the other scenes. In the early part of the play, Juliet and Nurse are really close and Nurse did almost anything for Juliet to be happy, Juliet confided in Nurse. However in this scene Nurse betrayed Juliet and Juliet told Nurse to leave. When in the other scene Juliet wanted Nurse to stay in the room while talking to Lady Capulet, this is an obvious change in Juliet's attitude to the Nurse. To conclude, Juliet's behaviour in Act III Scene V is at complete contrast to her behaviour in Act I Scene III. In Act I Scene III Juliet is the ideal young woman, the expected behaviour for an upper class Elizabethan woman. However, in Act III Scene V Juliet is argumentative and purposeful disobedient. She is obviously more mature as she has started to stand up for herself, you can tell this from her body language and the language she uses. ...read more.

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