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In chapter IX, volume 1, the monster states that its request for a mate is reasonable and moderate. Do you agree?

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Introduction

In chapter IX, volume 1, the monster states that its request for a mate is reasonable and moderate. Do you agree? I believe that the monster's request for a mate is in some ways reasonable and moderate, but could also be viewed as a selfish request, as the consequences of creating another of his species could be viewed as unfair to inflict upon another being, even if it was a creature of the same species as himself. His request is not completely reasonable, as he has been suffering so immensely, and experienced all the negative reactions and behaviour that has turned him into a fiend, and he wants another of his kind to be created. He hasn't really considered that it might not be a reasonable proposition based upon the fact that the mate he wants created is going to experience all the hardships that he has been through, and even if the Monster and his mate do leave "the neighbourhood of man", the mate could be a vicious creature. Frankenstein created the Monster out of dead body parts and toyed with the unknown. ...read more.

Middle

It would seems like a reasonable one, if he wasn't an unnatural being and a fiend to mankind. We have heard the monsters story of how lonely he is and how he has been treated and compassion is felt towards him, but I think that this in mind, another monster still should not be created. The relationship between the Monster and Frankenstein is very much so one of creator and creature. The Monster says "I demand it of you as a right" which shows that even though the Monster is making a demand here, he recognises the power that Frankenstein has to fulfil his desire and provide him with a female of his species. I believe that his request is fairly unreasonable, but the actual rationale that he gives for his request is reasonable. He puts forward a very compelling argument that seemingly stirs up emotion in Frankenstein, "I compassionated him and sometimes felt a wish to console him". Frankenstein, the supposed wretched monster is able to generate benevolent feelings within his creator, this leads Frankenstein to believe that maybe his request is not quite ...read more.

Conclusion

Frankenstein completely shunned the monster without reason, while the monster has only wanted to be good and benevolent until he was rejected by man, cast off by his own creator, who should have been teaching him right from wrong and raising him. Therefore, the Monster has shown that he has been a good being, and that surely his hardships have earned him the right to have a mate, or so he believes. I just don't think that it is reasonable to have Frankenstein create another of these beings and have all the pain and misery of being a 'Monster' inflicted upon them. The monster admits to having "evil passions", and even though in the context he says this in, his is referring to how they will flee, his admittance to possessing these evil passions is reason enough to believe that he still could be dangerous and may not hold to his promise. I think that his request is reasonable and moderate, but only because of his reasoning behind it. I think that the actual act of carrying out his request is not reasonable or moderate. ...read more.

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