• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

In 'Far From the Madding Crowd', Thomas Hardy examines different types of love. Consider the relationships Bathsheba has with Gabriel, Boldwood and Troy; consider also Troy's relationship with Fanny Robin.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Stephan Seiler Date: 8/05/02 Set 2 Mr. Longman English literature: Novel Assignment no: Pre-1900 'Far From the Madding Crowd' Final Draft Actual word count: 1,216 Minimum word count: 600 Date due: 22/05/02 Assignment: In 'Far From the Madding Crowd', Thomas Hardy examines different types of love. Consider the relationships Bathsheba has with Gabriel, Boldwood and Troy; consider also Troy's relationship with Fanny Robin. What conclusions does Thomas Hardy wish us to draw about the nature of love? Support the points you make with close reference to the text. You must also mention the social context of the novel and any relevant literary tradition. Bathsheba is a very vain woman who likes to think very highly of herself, in the first appearance she makes in the novel, she is admiring herself in the mirror. The last word in Chapter 1 is 'vanity'. Hardy has established some of the features of two of the main characters and made us curious about this development of the relationship between Oak and this vain but handsome girl. Bathsheba was not a conventional woman of her time. She was an unusual for a woman of her time because she was very independent. ...read more.

Middle

Make me think it was something more - that it was a sort of prophetic instinct - the beginning of a feeling that you would like me." Then Troy comes into the novel. During that period of time, there were strict rules governing the etiquette of behaviour about men and women being alone together and they certainly would not publicly touch each other or their clothes. This makes their meeting highly irregular. Bathsheba would be particularly vulnerable in this situation. Troy is similarly vain and teasing like Bathsheba, this enchants her, "Thank you for the sight of such a beautiful face!" He also often repeats the word, "Beauty" aimed obviously at Bathsheba. When they depart after their first 'encounter', she is very happy and feels flattered. She looks in the mirror (as usual) and repeats Troy's words, "Goodnight ... beauty!" Bathsheba is aware of her beauty, and she feels that if some handsome man in uniform compliments her on her looks, then that is very rewarding for her and it boosts her self-confidence. Also, Troy's showmanship with his sword swept Bathsheba off her feet. ...read more.

Conclusion

Troy's reaction to her death and his disregard for Bathsheba shows he is the type of man who only wants what he cannot have. When Fanny was alive, Troy showed little interest in her predicament. I think that the message Thomas Hardy is trying to get out is that love can only be true, not just for jokes and pranks (the valentines letter.) Love also has to have two people involved not like Fanny Robin and Troy at the start of the novel. In conclusion, Hardy ended the novel happily, because he knew that is what the readers wanted to read. The story was printed into a monthly magazine and for a Victorian readership; a happy end involved a marriage. Bathsheba was first attracted by Troy's good looks and superficial charm and preferred these qualities to the more traditional ones of security and love offered by Oak and Boldwood. But when Fanny dies, Bathsheba finally realizes that Troy's is actually a womanizer and he is disloyal. Hardy, himself did not rate marriage very highly as he had an unhappy marriage. So by the end of the novel, Bathsheba becomes more sensitive to others and realizes that she should have accepted Oak's initial proposal, rather than Troy's, and that she would have been much happier with Oak. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Far From the Madding Crowd section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Far From the Madding Crowd essays

  1. Compare and contrast Troy and Oak as representations of

    This simile within the first paragraph of the novel defines Oak as a force for good. In chapter 24 when Troy is first introduced, he is described as "Brilliant in brass and scarlet...his sudden appearance was to darkness what the sound of a trumpet is to silence".

  2. Discuss Hardy's Treatment of Women in "Far from the Madding Crowd"

    Bathsheba does not feel ready for marriage. She wants to be independent. Bathsheba receives her first proposal from Boldwood, "I come to make you an offer of marriage." Yet Bathsheba does not want to be married. In Victorian times when his novel was written marriage was viewed as a highly desirable state in most women's view, but this was not the case for Bathsheba.

  1. In Far from the Madding Crowd the major characters act out against a background ...

    this as they told her that they could "knock down in a bit and a drop a good deal freer" if they were sent to the malthouse instead. As seen earlier, Thomas Hardy frequently compares city life with country life.

  2. Bathsheba's marriage to Troy?

    Valentines Day card. As the novel moves on, there is a change in her character for the better. At the end of the novel, she is a mature woman free from vanity and pride. She cleans the tombstone of Fanny Robin, the lover of Sergeant Troy, her husband.

  1. In The Withered Arm how does Thomas Hardy present the characters of Rhoda and ...

    The means by which her character is revealed to us is very different from the milkers' insinuations about Rhoda that the story began with. Hardy's description of Gertrude by contrast, dwells very closely on her personal appearance, "The low sun...rendering every feature, shade and contour distinct, from the curve of her little nostril to the colour of her eyes."

  2. Using chapters 7, 11 & 40, Discuss how Hardy Presents Fanny Robin as the ...

    of until it's too late; the element of tragedy about her means that she is overlooked as anything significant especially by Troy and also by Oak; "Gabriel did not pause in his walk." On page 70 of the novel the subject of Fanny Robin is brought up by Bathsheba and

  1. Explore the Relationship between Bathsheba and Troy. What do we learn of Bathsheba's ...

    This piece of advice is delivered in a bitter tone in Bathsheba. The bitterness she feels comes from the incident with Troy over Fanny's coffin. When they return to the house and look through the collection of books stowed away in the attic.

  2. Relationships in "Far from the madding crowd". In this essay I will be characterizing ...

    Oak becomes more of an observer but always remains loyal to Bathsheba in the sense that he always helps her out when needed with good intentions. Oak is central character in the theme of fate that is centered on this book-one Thomas Hardy is known to have been a strong believer in.).

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work