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In Jane Austen's novel, 'Pride and Prejudice', there are, eventually, five married couples. A discussion on Marriage.

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Introduction

In Jane Austen's novel, 'Pride and Prejudice', there are, eventually, five married couples. Marriage is the main theme of the novel, which is clearly indicated in the first line of the book 'It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in pocesion of a good fortune must be in want of a wife'. I am going to concentrate on two of the five marriages, Jane Bennet and Bingley and Elizabeth Bennet and Fitzwilliam Darcy. As I look at these couples I will see how they compare and contrast. Bingley is a man with wealth and good social skills. Bingley leases Netherfield and unlike Darcy he is very popular with everyone because he is kind amiable and has good manners. I also think Bingley is a little naive and is well described by Elizabeth saying he is a man who is 'very easy to understand'. Jane is the kind and gentle sister of Elizabeth and, unlike her sister, she is oblivious to the ways of the world and finds good in everyone. ...read more.

Middle

She is also bright and realistic about life. Unlike her sister, Jane she is not ready to believe that everyone is perfect. Elizabeth is aware of her father's unhappiness with Mrs Bennet, which shows she is very intelligent and observant. Elizabeth is also not afraid to speak her mind - a good example of her readiness to do so is her outburst at Darcy's proposal. Elizabeth's main flaw though is her exaggerated prejudice toward Darcy. Her first negative impression of Darcy was at the Assembly ball in Meryton. It was here Jane overheard Darcy saying 'she is tolerable but not handsome enough to tempt me'. Her prejudice against Darcy is strengthened when Wickham told Elizabeth his unfounded story of his ill treatment and when she finds out that Darcy influenced Bingley against Jane. These comments just fuelled Elizabeth's prejudice. Later in the novel when Darcy proposes to her she refuses him and does not even give the offer serious thought. ...read more.

Conclusion

This illustrates they both have an avid interest for reading. The marriage of Elizabeth and Darcy is also based firmly on love for one another. Although Darcy's love is not expressed until the end of the novel, he does say 'You must allow me to tell you I admire and love you'. This shows the readers he I not afraid to express his feelings. Elizabeth shows her love towards Darcy when Mr Bennet calls her into his library after Darcy's proposal. When Mr Bennet questions Elizabeth's affections for Darcy she says 'I do like him I love him'. Elizabeth is aware that her feelings toward Darcy have not always been positive but she believes that he will be able to make her happy. Therefore this reflects Elizabeth and Darcy have married for love just like Jane and Bingley. These are two very different couples but at the same time have a lot in common. They have both had problems but eventually they find great happiness in their love of one another. By Richard Harpur. ...read more.

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