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In the extract where Pip, a boy from a very humble background meets Miss Havisham, a rich but eccentric lady, Dickens wants the reader to feel sympathetic towards Pip. How does he make us feel this way?

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Introduction

Great Expectations Essay Question In the extract where Pip, a boy from a very humble background meets Miss Havisham, a rich but eccentric lady, Dickens wants the reader to feel sympathetic towards Pip. How does he make us feel this way? Great Expectations was one of the most successful novels ever written by Dickens. The novel focuses on the life of Pip, a boy from a humble background. The novel also focuses a lot on Miss Havisham, a rich but eccentric lady which Pip meets early on when he is a boy, but gradually as he grows up, assumes that she has helped him become wealthy. This may not be the case. Dickens has written this novel in first person of Pip so the reader can hear the story directly from Pip. We witness his thoughts and feelings. Dickens is very successful in creating sympathy for Pip, as you see his story from his, a young boy's, point of view. Dickens uses the power of having Pip as the narrator. He is narrating as an adult, but from a young boy's point of view. This makes us feel sympathetic towards Pip. Pip meets Miss Havisham through Mr. Pumblechook, when he is summoned to 'play' with her. He first meets Estella at the gates, and is instantly attracted to her, as she is a very pretty girl. ...read more.

Middle

Miss Havisham answer- only it seemed so unlikely-" This makes the reader feel very sorry and sympathetic towards Pip, as we know that he doesn't quite know what to think at this point. He doesn't know whether Miss Havisham and Estella really meant what they said, or whether his ears had failed him and he hadn't heard correctly what they had been talking about, which I think he was desperately hoping that this was the case. I think that here, Pip's heart has already been broken- because, maybe, Pip was supposed to hear Miss Havisham and Estella's conversation. Miss Havisham seems to like asking Pip about Estella. She eventually finds out from Pip that he thinks she is pretty and that yes, he is attracted to her. Miss Havisham asks Pip; "What do you think of her?" He replies; "I think she is very proud, insulting and pretty" This is exactly what Miss Havisham wants to hear, for as soon as Pip asks to go home, she replies: "And never see her again, though she is so pretty? Miss Havisham obviously is pleased to know that Pip has taken a liking to Estella even though she is so rude to him, and we are worried about Pip, as we know he is going to get hurt in one way or another by now. She is now well on the way to breaking his heart. ...read more.

Conclusion

The ultimate offence from Estella to Pip is when she puts a few scraps on a plate and a drink on the floor as if he is a "disgraced dog" as he said. Pip then says that he was so "humiliated, hurt, spurned, sorry, offended and angry", but he had done nothing wrong. Readers will really feel sorry for Pip here. Pip then goes against a wall and cries, and cries, and different emotions and thoughts and feelings rush over him that he has never thought of before, but you can tell he has had his heart broken from the way he has just been treated. We feel very sorry for him then, because for a young boy of Pip's age to have to go through this, it can't be right. As you read through, you can almost feel his pain, and you dislike Estella and Miss Havisham for doing this to him. This is where Dickens is the most successful in creating sympathy for Pip. Overall, Dickens was very successful in creating sympathy from the readers towards Pip. He has put the extract in first person, so it is being told by Pip, and although it may be slightly exaggerated, it is told from a young boy's perspective, so you think of what a young boy of Pip's age would be able to put up with. We see how Miss Havisham and Estella try to and successfully break Pip's heart, as towards the end of the extract Pip cries a lot. ...read more.

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