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In this essay I will be discussing how Jane Austen approaches the themes of marriage and breeding in the novel Pride and Prejudice.

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Introduction

Pride and Prejudice In this essay I will be discussing how Jane Austen approaches the themes of marriage and breeding in the novel Pride and Prejudice. I shall also be talking about the social, historical and cultural background to the novel. Jane Austen was born in 1775, into an upper class family. Wealth and class are key issues for the time, but at the time at which the novel is set the relationships between classes is beginning to break down. For centuries, England's economy depended on agriculture, and usually wealthily people owned large country estates. With the industrial revolution, however, wealth began to concentrate in the cities. During Jane Austen's life she stayed single and spent much of her life writing and going to fashionable parties like the one Miss Bennet and Mr Darcy assemble at . Jane Austen observes the biased views of marriage of the upper social class in the novel. "It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife." Is the ironic suggestion that Jane Austen begins Pride and Prejudice with. ...read more.

Middle

Elizabeth is firstly set up with Mr. Collins, her cousin. He is given the choice out of all the girls and is quite taken by Elizabeth's older sister but quickly focus his attention on Elizabeth when he is told she is taken. Elizabeth however, does not believe in marriage for a gain in wealth, but for genuine love and affection. The structure and style that Jane Austen used was very detailed and she could construct a plot well. The story shows the different stages of two young people (Elizabeth and Darcy) falling in love when they really don't want to, whilst the other characters events are shown at the same time. In the first part of the book Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth hate each other, then Mr. Darcy falls in love with Elizabeth and asks her to marry him, but she rejects his offer. In the second part Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy overcome both of their pride and prejudice's, develop a better understanding of each other and eventually get married. The main plot of Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy's love story is centred around Mr. Bingly and Jane's love story along with Charlotte Lucas and Mr. ...read more.

Conclusion

It also shows Mrs. Bennett is not used to having servants and was brought up in a common way. In reflection, Elizabeth always speaks with thought and is not overly talkative. We can assume that Jane Austen thought herself to be an intelligent observer of her society as she speaks through the character of Elizabeth, who is intelligent and is the character who mainly observes her society. '...it would be wise in me to refrain from that.' Here Elizabeth shows that she understands when to keep quiet or not to do something. Through what the characters say and do, Jane Austen shows irony by making many of them seem polite, such as Elizabeth, but in reality they are laughing at the things going on around them. Mr. Bennett is an excellent example of this, as his wife thinks he is agreeing with her, when actually he is just mocking her. In conclusion, Elizabeth manages to overcome her mother's objections to the pomposity and deign of her long-time adversary, Mr Darcy, and find true love. The book is full of minor characters who mostly marry for the wrong reasons. Charlotte married for status, Lydia married for physical attraction and Mrs Hirst married for money. But the Bennett sisters are manipulated by Jane Austen to marry for the only thing worth marrying for true love. By Ashling Ledden 11d 1 ...read more.

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