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In What Ways Does Shakespeare Create Disorder And Confusion in Act 3 Scene 2?

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Introduction

Richard Taylor In What Ways Does Shakespeare Create Disorder And Confusion in Act 3 Scene 2? Here are many ways in which Shakespeare creates disorder and confusion in act 3 scene 2. One of the ways in which he does this is to bring in the supernatural aspect of the play into the scene. Such as the fact that an "outside force", which are Oberon and Puck, interfere with and control the affairs of the players (Hermia, Helena, Demetrius and Lysander). He brings the supernatural in with the fairies. While asleep, Puck squeezes the juice of a flower into the eyes of Lysander, thus making him fall in love with the first person he sees. He is woken by Helena who he then falls in love with and this begins the havoc. Every time the couples encounter there is always more confusion with their arguing. Soon the fairies realise their mistake, so Puck squeezes the juice into Demetrius eyes which also makes him fall in love with Helena. This confusion continues to spiral out of control due to the fairies intervention and Puck's mistake. Because Helena's love for Demetrius has previously been in vain and he now loves her also as Lysander, she believes that they are both mocking her as they are both suddenly mysteriously and madly in love with her. ...read more.

Middle

HeleThe way this process goes through leading one situation into an even worse situation then to were it is completely turned on its head is very confusing, but also highly comical due to the dramatic irony that the audience and the two fairies know what is going on but the players do not. The language of Demetrius and Lysander are highly exaggerated in the fact that what they are saying are the complete opposites to what they should be saying as they have been made to feel that way due to the intervention of the fairies. You can tell that their language is highly exaggerated because their perception on what is happening has completely changed as the situation has flipped on its head. I think that in this play it is quite funny when Demetrius awakes and is in love with Helena, as in act 3 scene 2 - line 136, Lysander says "Demetrius loves her, and he loves not you" then in the very next line when Demetrius wakes up you get "O Helen, goddess, nymph, perfect, divine!" I think this is funny because just when Lysander says that Demetrius does not love her and is telling her he does; Demetrius wakes up and begins to blurt out compliments to Helena. ...read more.

Conclusion

All of the mishaps throughout the play are not resolved until the morning when you see that Lysander is with Hermia and Demetrius is with Helena and the confusion is cleared up. The setting for it to have been in night can make it seem to the players and possibly the audience that it was all just a fantastical dream. This helps to clear up all of the confusion that the audience had just seen and the players had taken part in. because they think it was all a dream they may think it is foolish to talk about it or maybe they just do not want to. I think that Shakespeare uses many ways to create disorder, in the fact that he completely turns the situation upside down, and creates a lot of confusion. I think that the use of dramatic irony in the play also helps this. I think the dramatic irony plays a big part in making the play confusing, as well as the fairies do, as just when the audience knows what is going on and thinks its funny, Shakespeare again brings in the fairies the add another bit of confusion to the play. And also without the fairies intervention in the first place there wouldn't be this confusing situation. ...read more.

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