• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Is Joseph Conrad a Racist?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Is Joseph Conrad a Racist? The Nigerian novelist Chinua Achebe made claims in the 1970s that `Heart of Darkness' was a racist novella. My initial thoughts on this are yet to be decided during the course of this essay. While my thoughts are yet to have any significance, I do believe that Chinua Achebe's remarks hold some truth. Achebe's theory assumes that Marlow and Conrad are the same voice. This could be a reasonable assumption as research into Conrad's life has given us knowledge of Conrad's early years. In the `heart of darkness' the main character, Marlow has since childhood, had a desire to "go there" (Africa), whilst exploring maps of the world. Conrad, in the `Introduction' of the book, also explored maps and, like Marlow, travelled up the river Congo. Therefore one could assume that `Heart of Darkness' is a brief account of one man's life experience in a land so misunderstood, judged and rejected. The narrator of the novella is at the beginning, and during intermissions of Marlow's dialogue, an anonymous hired hand that introduces Marlow. The not-so-obvious presence of this character will in no doubt make Chinua Achebe's claims groundless and in a sense a lie. Conrad has distanced himself from this novella by creating not one but two narrators in the same materiel. Therefore the audience will not only hear Marlow's accounts and opinions but also that of this unnamed hired hand. The story revolves around two great rivers. The rivers in question are the Thames and the Congo. ...read more.

Middle

In particular his `late helmsman' "No; I cannot forget him, though I am not prepared to affirm the fellow was exactly worth the life we lost in getting him." That, and a whole page and a half was dedicated in reminisce and sorrow by Marlow for his late `helmsman', to clarify the matter - his late (black) helmsman. Kurtz, a white, symbolic god-figure in European civilization and also in the African society, was not "worth the life [he] lost in getting him". Does one need to look elsewhere to find Marlow's/Conrad's impartiality and respect for the African race? The two women in the novella show us something about Conrad's approach to race. Kurtz's "INTENDED" is portrayed as being the typical weaker vessel on Marlow's visit to Belgium. "She came forward, all in black, with a pale head, floating towards me in the dusk. She was in mourning. It was more the a year since his death,..." This Belgian aristocrat comes across to me as a woman of leisure and glory with the advantage of assistance from a dominant state at a time like this, yet is depicted as the stereotypical weaker vessel; in black and still in mourning more than a year after the death of Kurtz. This illustration of her suggests to me although being a woman of rank and intelligence the distressed and feebleness witnessed by Marlow on his visit will secure the predictable end like that of a grieving widow, patronisingly solemn and melodramatic. Contrary to Kurtz's Belgian fianc� his African mistress possesses a more mature, unique conduct. ...read more.

Conclusion

He saw the intelligence on the African people, and he saw the enlightening knowledge the west could have gained rather than robbed. And I believe he must have seen the fear in western eyes that Africans were a threat to the growing empire established by force and brutality. "... your strength is just an accident arising from the weakness of others." Conrad implies a lot about the act of colonising and the mind of the powerful. I see this statement as a brief history of colonisation; I do consider that Conrad believes that colonies could only have occurred because of the weakness of the colonised. Like a bully thrives on the fear of the bullied so also the whole act of colonising depends on the weakness or strength of the targeted nation. I believe `Heart of Darkness' is not a novella justifying the acts of the white man but shaming and condemning the under cover motives they used in seeking their desires. Ultimately the most fascinating figure in the novella is the enigmatic Kurtz. It is very had to conclude indefinitely what Marlow thought of Kurtz. Having undergone such a remarkable period of time with Kurtz, Marlow himself appears to be recuperating from the haunting experience at being in a critical point of the life of such a man as Mr Kurtz. No doubt the episode is engraved in his mind but it will bring about positive and negative opinions of the man as Kurtz presence was establish to the audience during the last few days of his life. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Joseph Conrad section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Joseph Conrad essays

  1. How does Conrad present the company and Marlow's attitude towards its representatives? "Heart of ...

    arousing some suspicion in the mind of Marlow and the reader. This also shows that Marlow realises that the representatives of the Company cannot be trusted. Perhaps he is also desperate to see Mr Kurtz, who is said to be "an exceptional man, of greatest importance..."

  2. Analizing Marlow

    This shows that Marlow considers the natives as savages, in a similar tone to what other Europeans supposedly call them "civilizing." Not only is Marlow outspoken, but he is also very judgmental. The following holds true when Marlow first meets the stations accountant, "I shook hands with this miracle, and I learned he was the company's chief accountant ...

  1. To what extent do I agree with Chinua Achebe's assertionthat Joseph Conrad was 'a ...

    This suggests that he does not think colonialism is wrong as he points out that 'they were no colonists' as if highlighting to his listeners that they should not consider these men as good people, we can see this from what he says next - 'It was just robbery with

  2. Comparing "The Darkness Out There" by Penelope Lively, with "The Black Veil" by Charles ...

    from knowing the full facts until the story progressed, keeping me reading on. The tension and suspense starts in "The Black Veil" with the presence of a mysterious figure "shrouded" by a "thick black veil" entering the surgeon's surgery the tension rises as we have no idea about the "apparition" described to us.

  1. Joseph Conrad - author review

    Fill you thought yourself bewitched and cut off for ever from everything you had once - somewhere - faraway - in another existence perhaps".3 Marlow continues his amusings on the nature of the wilderness. As the river boat goes deeper and deeper into the heart of the continent, he says it goes deeper and deeper into heart of darkness.

  2. Discuss The Title Of Conrad's Novel 'Heart Of Darkness'.

    Marlow describes how the men smarten themselves in the presence of a white man, "...hoisted his weapon to his shoulder with alacrity." Conrad builds up to a climax, with the use of bathos, as Marlow states sarcastically and ironically "After all, I also was part of the great cause of these high and just proceedings."

  1. Critical review of Joseph Conrad's

    Conrad wrote this novel with an intention for a reader to understand that Kurtz is hiding in all of us and that we all have the essentials to develop evil and later spread it in our society. However, Conrad emphasizes the point that not many people are truly able to

  2. Transformation - A critical analysis of the main character, The Captain of the unnamed ...

    The Captain states that he perceives himself to be a stranger amongst the others. Among his insecurities, the captain also sees himself as a stranger to himself and not fit to run his ship. The captain thinks, "But what I felt most was my being a stranger to the ship;

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work