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'It has been argued that Act three is the dramatic climax of 'The Crucible'. Discuss how far you agree with this argument.'

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Introduction

H/W 21/02/2007 'It has been argued that Act three is the dramatic climax of 'The Crucible'. Discuss how far you agree with this argument.' In my opinion Act three is the dramatic climax of 'The Crucible' but Act four also includes some very dramatic moments so could be considered as another dramatic climax to the play. In this essay I shall tell you why Act three is the dramatic climax and will also talk about why other acts build the tension up towards this climax. Miller uses allegory as he makes the audience think that he is only writing about 1692 Salem but he is also writing about, although not referring to the 1940s McCarthyism. In Acts one and two Miller creates dramatic tension and suspends the audience. Miller tries to give his views on witchcraft through John Proctor, as Proctor has very strong views on this subject. He tries to say that he believes there is no such thing as witchcraft and hates communism. The Acts in 'The Crucible' follow a four part dramatic structure founded by a man called Gustav Freytag. The four parts are: exposition, Rising action, climax (turning point) and the falling action. These are split over the four acts and in each of the acts I will show you how these work with that particular act. Act one, is known as the exposition, which contains the inciting moment, the event that occurs which changes everything that happens then on. ...read more.

Middle

The setting, lighting and sound effects all create dramatic tension, as the lighting, a fireplace suggests peaceful surroundings towards the beginning of the act but towards the end the fire signifies hatred and anger. The setting of the dinner table and the kitchen shows that it is a normal home at the beginning of the Act but towards the end this is not the case as it is not normal that Elizabeth is convicted of being a witch. And finally the sound effects, like the door being knocked on when Herrick arrives with the warrant for Elizabeth's arrest, it suspends the audience leaving them wandering, what will happen next? Who is at the door? How will it link in with what is happening at the moment? This all leads up to the third Act of 'The Crucible', which is known as the climax (turning point). This is where here is a sudden change of events due to a bad decision by the protagonist. Miller manipulates the audiences response in this act by not showing them what is happening in the courtroom in the first scene. He does this because this is the only act which starts off hysterically, as all of the other acts start of calm and end hysterically, but this act starts off hysterically and ends also hysterically. There are many parts of the Act that could be considered as the dramatic climax but these are all just scenes that create tension building up to the dramatic climax. ...read more.

Conclusion

John Proctor wishes to die as a martyr and not live the rest of his life in shame so he tries to have his confession removed by testing the nerve of Danforth by taking away the confession and ripping it up. Danforth then tells the marshal to take Proctor away. Elizabeth comes running up to him and cries on his hand, but he says "Give them no tears! Tears pleasure them! Show honour, show a stony heart and sink them with it!" He then kisses her "passionately" and goes. Then Danforth says angrily "Hang them high over the town! Who weeps for these, weeps for corruption!" Therefore, John Proctor dies as a hero, which ends the play very well, as it ends on a proud note. Because John Proctor dies with pride knowing that "Another judgement awaits us all!" In conclusion, Act three is the dramatic climax of the crucible, as all the tension built up in previous act is all released in this act, which creates a greater climax. Act four is not the dramatic climax because the peak at Act three which was the dramatic climax made sure that it was more dramatic than any other Act. In Act four it was just calming everything down after the climax, but Act four's climax was minute compared to Act three. Act four ended the play superbly, as Proctor the protagonist did not finish as the enemy but the martyr, and Danforth ended as the enemy. ...read more.

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