• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Jay Gatsby's character encompasses a lot of characteristics at once

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Nahedeh IB1 English HL 2005-10-04 Jay Gatsby's character encompasses a lot of characteristics at once, making him one of the most diverse characters in the book. As we move deeper and deeper into the novel, we discover that we can narrow down Gatsby's characteristics down to a few adjectives. One of the main adjectives that can be written onto Jay Gatsby is ambitious. We can say to a very large extent that Gatsby's character is very ambitious. ...read more.

Middle

He never surrenders and feels hopeless over Daisy, yet instead he strives harder and harder as the days go by to seduce her. This is a solid proof of his ambition for love. He has such a strong willed heart that he will never let go of it until the day he dies; which is what happens. In addition he never realized that maybe he can't ever have Daisy, but of course his ambition has worked too hard to give up when he's tried for so long. ...read more.

Conclusion

He isn't a part of the established wealth however through buying his way into everything, especially the social life and Daisy's heart; he thinks he can be a part of the East Egg lifestyle. His ambition for this position in society is very courageous and bold. At first his ambition for getting into his business and the upper-class life was so great that he even changed his name. He thought that the name Jay Gatsby had a more promising and lucrative sound to it than James Gatz. Obviously he was right, but we must admit that it wasn't his name that got him as far as he did; it was the ambition behind the name. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE F. Scott Fitzgerald section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a star student thought of this essay

4 star(s)

Response to the question

This question asks candidates how F. Scott Fitzgerald's character of Jay Gatsby can be said to be ambitious. This candidate does very well to address some obvious and often overlooked aspects of the character of Jay Gatsby, originally James Gatz, ...

Read full review

Response to the question

This question asks candidates how F. Scott Fitzgerald's character of Jay Gatsby can be said to be ambitious. This candidate does very well to address some obvious and often overlooked aspects of the character of Jay Gatsby, originally James Gatz, in order to address the question. However, this candidate is not able to achieve any higher than a middle C grade because of the negligence with quotations and evidence from the source text they're analysing. Without these quotes, candidates' answers are stunted and regardless of the quality of the response to the question, they cannot expect to achieve a high grade, as everything the candidate says must be backed up with quotes from the source text to be considered an effective analysis.

Level of analysis

Without quotes, the analysis is dubious. What the candidate does say they, is entirely indicative of someone who can achieve a sound B grade. There is an appreciation of often overlooked thematic elements such as Jay Gatsby's new name and what it says about himself; an illustrious, mysterious name with greater resonance than James Gatz. Also a promising analysis, is the commentary on Gatsby's parties and his obsessions with Daisy Buchanan.
To achieve higher marks, the candidate could've made more explicit the connection with Gatsby's ambition of Daisy. They comment very well on how he becomes obsessed with her, indulging in illegal acts in order to throw lavish parties to impress her, but the real blind ambition is in Gatsby's hopes that Daisy is still the woman she was when they were last together. However, that was five years ago, and it should be realised that Gatsby's ambition for Daisy is futile as she is no longer the woman she once was, and could never satisfy the image he has held in his mind and heart for five years.

Quality of writing

The Quality of Written Communication is low, but only because there is very little confidence shown in writing. There are small sentences and a clear understanding of how to use simple punctuation, but further use of it could improve the answer.


Did you find this review helpful? Join our team of reviewers and help other students learn

Reviewed by sydneyhopcroft 25/02/2012

Read less
Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE F. Scott Fitzgerald essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    Discuss the effectiveness of the opening chapter of Fitzgerald’s ‘the Great Gatsby’.

    5 star(s)

    He is different from the American aristocracy of old money and hedonistic lifestyles, a fact illustrated by his home: "a small eyesore...all for eighty dollars" by contrast to the "huge places that rented for twelve or fifteen thousand a season".

  2. Great Gatsby Reading Questions and answers.

    Fitzgerald reveals these rumours to see what people think about Gatsby behind his back. 4. What does Nick think of Gatsby after meeting him? Nick was surprised when he met Gatsby. He beings to like Gatsby. He thinks Gatsby is a pleasant, calm and polite guy.

  1. "Show how the paring of two texts this year gave you an understanding on ...

    Gatsby to follow his dream of winning back the love of Daisy, green representing 'go'. Steinbeck employs the use of a turtle in chapter three to symbolise the struggle for survival, the pursuit of the American Dream and the perseverance of the human spirit.

  2. Examine the contradictions in The Great Gatsby, including its narrative styles.

    Jordan Baker, a friend of Daisy's, recounts the story of Gatsby and Daisy's romantic history to Nick, our objective narrator: '...and she (Daisy) was sitting in it with a lieutenant I had never seen before. They were so engrossed in eachother that she didn't see me...The officer looked at Daisy...in

  1. How do Thomas Hardy and F.Scott Fitzgerald present the issue of women's choices in ...

    After a while Matth�us Tina, the German Hussar decides to run away as he does not like England. He wants to take Phyllis with him. "...you go with me...be my wife there" Phyllis' main decision is when she decides to join him.

  2. Discuss the extent to which a novel has been successful in expressing ideas which ...

    His desire for Daisy symbolizes the basis of the old dream as it is an incredible goal and a constant search for the opportunity to reach this goal. This is shown when Gatsby is first introduced into the novel. "He stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a

  1. ‘He paid a high price for living too long with a single dream’ with ...

    Gatsby's home, a mansion on Long Island, is situated on the "hot sands of his beach". Additionally Fitzgerald depicts "Gatsby's enormous garden" and emphasizes the size of his mansion through use of lists of the "halls and salons and verandas".

  2. How much do we learn about Gatsby's character and how is it revealed to ...

    To the people who attended these parties, they were simply that. People just turned up without invitations and joined in regardless of who was holding them. Gatsby himself recognises this and when he talks to Carraway he acknowledges that he is a bad host at these functions.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work