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King Duncan's murder marks the beginning of Macbeth's downfall. Who can be held mostly responsible for this?

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Introduction

King Duncan's murder marks the beginning of Macbeth's downfall. Who can be held mostly responsible for this? 'Macbeth' is an extremely intricate play, full of suspense, guilt, tension, and superstition. It is an old-fashioned play which was written during the reign of King James I, and it portrays some of the events that occurred while he was on the throne. Witches were one of the main supernatural characters that people believed in, as well as the King. When Shakespeare wrote this play, witchcraft had been seen as important element of black magic and people believed in it, who ever possessed such skill, were able to achieve their goals and at the time it was a considerable issue, Shakespeare used the distinguished characters of the three witches in presenting this theme. Without a doubt the three witches have a demoralizing effect on Macbeth. Macbeth tells a story of a man (Macbeth), who is a man of aspiration and forceful nature with drastic action. As the play opens, Macbeth is seen as the defender of Scotland against the triple alliance of the King of Norway, the rebel Macdonwald from the secret rebel, the Thane of Condor Macbeth meets three witches who foretell a great future for the general- that he will be Thane of Cawdor, and then the King. ...read more.

Middle

In this scene Macbeth wakes up to the reality and realises the evil he has done. First, he is responsible for the death of King Duncan. Now he has hired murderers to kill Banquo and his son Fleance, so that the witches' prophecies cannot be fulfilled. The scene opens like any other grand dinner party. Macbeth bids everyone a "hearty welcome" and says he will "play the humble host". When informed by the murderers that Fleance has 'escaped', Macbeth hints that his mind is becoming unhinged: "There comes my fit again" When Macbeth hears the news that Fleance has escaped he says that he feels, "Cabin'd, cribbed, confined." Macbeth tries to forget the news, which has mystified him, turns his attention to the guests: "Now good digestion wait on appetite, and health on both!" Macbeth at this stage, began to hallucinate, almost as it prompted by this, Banquo's ghost takes his place at the table. Well puzzled and shocked. Macbeth at first puts the blame on the guests, asking, "Which one of you done this?" He addresses the ghost directly. Lady Macbeth tries to divert criticism, as she did previously after King Duncan's murder and implies that Macbeth is having a fit. "The fit is momentary...feeds regard him not." ...read more.

Conclusion

In the next scene of the play we hear from the sergeant how bravely Macbeth has fought against Macdonwald and his band of rebels; and then against the Norwegian and the Scottish traitor the 'Thane of Cawdor'. The sergeant describe Macbeth as being 'brave Macbeth' and loyal. Duncan calls Macbeth his 'valiant cousin'. Duncan orders Ross to pronounce the death of the 'Thane of Cawdor' and then give his position to Macbeth. Another supernatural element in this play is the dagger. I personally think that the dagger plays a big part in the play because it leads to Macbeth in committing murder. The relationship between Macbeth and Banquo appears to be of friendship, which is ironic as later in the play we find that he kills him. I am able to see a big contrast between the two of them. Banquo is described as an honourable man, where as Macbeth is described as a deceiver. Banquo conscientiously fights evil thoughts saying, 'restrain in me'. He uses kind and open words in his report of Duncan. 'Keep my bosom franchised and alliance clear'. At the end the scene finishes with Macbeth is on his way to kill King Duncan but then hallucinates a dagger. He questions himself saying, 'is this a dagger which I see before me'? Macbeth is left to be haunted by his evil nature. English Coursework Nahidur Rahman 10o Ma7 Macbeth 1 ...read more.

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