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'Look closely at chapters one and eight from 'Great Expectations'. How does Dickens make these interesting and dramatic for the reader?'

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Introduction

Theresa Dolan 'Look closely at chapters one and eight from 'Great Expectations'. How does Dickens make these interesting and dramatic for the reader?' In chapters one and eight Charles Dickens creates interesting scenes for the reader by incorporating two very interesting characters, both of whom are older than Pip. Magwitch, who is a very scary convict, he has escaped from jail and so his clothes are tattered. Next is Mrs Havisham, who is an old lady. She was 'stood up' on her wedding day and so dresses in her wedding gown that has faded. Also Dickens' used two different settings one outside and one in doors. There is a similarity between them as they are both sombre places, one churchyard the other a dark dilapidated room. He uses interesting vocabulary, which creates character and atmosphere. In both of the chapters the settings create intense drama as negative imagery is used. Chapter one is set on the marshes 'intersected with dykes and mounds'. In the churchyard which was 'overgrown with nettles' and with 'graves'. ...read more.

Middle

Magwitch is very anxious as he starts to flee straight away when Pip tells him that his mother is just 'there'. Although he is portrayed as a scary character he shows some compassion towards Pip when he tells him about his mother and father 'oh'. Then when he is leaving he 'hugged' himself as if to try and hold himself together which shows he is weak. Straight away when Mrs Havisham is introduced it tells you that she was the 'strangest' lady Pip had ever seen or shall ever see. This automatically gets the reader thinking she is going to be a very dramatic character. The way she is sitting with her elbow 'resting' on the table and her head 'leaning' on her hand suggests that she has been waiting there along time. Her clothes also suggest this, as they are 'faded and yellow'. It says she has 'withered' and lost all 'brightness' except her 'sunken' eyes, I picture her as being very scary someone who would look down on anyone. ...read more.

Conclusion

Drama is created because it is not normal and there is an element of an unpredictable nature of things. Pip is terrified of Magwitch. He pleads with him in 'terror'. He does everything he is told. When he is with Mrs Havisham he is fearful of her. He stands 'avoiding her eyes'. This creates drama since the character is unsettled, consequently the reader becomes uneasy. Estella creates drama, as she is impertinent towards Pip 'don't be ridiculous, boy'. This is peculiar as she is about the same age as Pip. She is also disrespectful to Mr Pumblechook 'Ah!...but ...she don't' this creates drama because she should speak with respect for her elders and she sees there is nothing wrong with being disrespectful. I feel Dickens has been very successful in creating an interesting and dramatic story for the reader. I think it was important that so much of the novel was dramatic because it is very long, and so you must keep the reader interested or they will not finish reading it. I also believe that it is because when 'Great Expectations' was first published in 1860 it was sold in weekly episodes. ...read more.

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