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Macbeth act V sceen 3 - What is the importance of this scene to your interpretation of the play? Include a discussion of the plot, character, themes and use of language and dramatic techniques.

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Introduction

Assessment Practice: What is the importance of this scene to your interpretation of the play? Include a discussion of the plot, character, themes and use of language and dramatic techniques. Macbeth by William Shakespeare deals with morals and human reactions, in terms of ones circumstances and aroused temptation. Macbeth's inner-self sides from good to evil due to bad decisions, which is the basis of the tragedy. My interpretation demonstrates how excess ambition can lead to unquestioned deception. The witches deceive the contrary Macbeth to think he is invincible. Act V Scene 3 further contributes to this understanding by developing character, theme, and plot by using language and dramatic techniques. Macbeth is a "worthy" man at the start of the play, being complemented "brave Macbeth - well he deserves that name." The witches are the play's source of evil, and after discussing their killing of a sea captain (I, 3); they concentrate their wickedness on destroying Macbeth. ...read more.

Middle

Macbeth knows that this battle will be the decider, "chair me ever or disseat me now." This line creates dramatic imagery of the battle yet to occur, but also shows the responder how Macbeth has doubts and how false in reality his fearlessness actually is. The audience knows that the witches worded their prophecies in such a way to ensure that Macbeth misinterprets them, so he feels safe. This causes Macbeth's overconfidence in this scene, but he still admits to be "sick at heart." Still, Macbeth says, "I'll fight till from my bones my flesh be hacked", which is strong violent imagery that shows his determination to win or finally be defeated and be removed from his suffering. Both Macbeth and Lady Macbeth suffer sleeplessness since they begun their murderous rampage, "Macbeth will sleep no more" (II, 2). ...read more.

Conclusion

and "What soldiers, whey-face?" are examples of sarcasm to hide the inner unease caused by the English force approaching. The tone in "thou cream-faced loon!" is bold and shows his overconfidence. During Act V Scene 3, the responder sees more of Macbeth's madness, frustration and pathetic trust in the prophecies. Shakespeare ends the scene with rhyming couplets to connect to the audience while Macbeth delivers his final stance before the battle begins, "I will not be afraid of death and bane / Till Birnam Forest come to Dunsinane". Concluding, strong dramatic contrast is what Shakespeare builds upon to create a dramatic conflict, tension and impact. Universal conflicts such as good vs. evil; violence vs. guilt and appearances vs. reality are emphasised in Act V Scene 3. Shakespeare uses a wealth of dramatic techniques to convey his message and illustrate the scene visually to the responder's mind. Macbeth demonstrates that good will defeat evil, with violence comes unshakable guilt and appearances are not always what they seem. Brad Rushworth ...read more.

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