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Mary Shelley explores the discovery of scientific possibilities, obsession and the consequence of desires in many different ways in the novel Frankenstein.

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Introduction

Mary Shelley explores the discovery of scientific possibilities, obsession and the consequence of desires in many different ways in the novel Frankenstein, Frankenstein was written in Victorian England and was one of the founding science fiction novels. The main themes of Frankenstein stem from science fiction and one man's ambition to spark life into lifeless matter. Shelley introduces the theme of science into the novel through the leading character Victor Frankenstein, he is a man obsessed by the power of knowledge "bless me as its creator" and is driven by the possibilities of modern science. During the early 1800's an interest for science was slowly becoming evident in society, furthermore at this time Darwinism was a newly found concept centered around man evolving from apes as oppose to the religious ideas of God creating man. Due to this Victorian society was no longer to just accept the spoon-fed idea that God was the creator, and people started to question why they could not "play God". In addition to this at around this time an Italian Physiologist called Luigi Galvani who is noted for his studies of the effects of electricity on animal nerves and muscles. ...read more.

Middle

Instead he was left to read the book and decide for himself if it was "trash" or the highest level of intelligence. During the novel Frankenstein even names his father as the sole contributor to his obsession with science "if instead of his remarks my father had taken the pains to explain that the principles of Agrippa had been entirely exploded... I should certainly have thrown Agrippa aside". Frankenstein's obsession for knowledge is constantly growing especially during his days at Ingolstadt but is accelerated when M Waldman starts to teach him. Frankenstein immediately gains a good understanding and high mutual level of respect for each other "an aspect expressive of the greatest benevolence". Waldman later explains that "miracles" can happen, this gives wind to Frankenstein's imagination and after Waldman's Death ultimately leads him to fulfill his wildest dreams to be respected, obtain more knowledge and most importantly "play God". Frankenstein's obsession is at its strongest during the creation of the monster. By this point the thirst for knowledge has even started to take over his inner thoughts "Cornelius Agrippa, Albertus Magnus and Paracelsus the lords of my imagination". This shows that due to Frankenstein's self isolation, working through both day and night "darkness has no effect upon my mind" he has lost all touch with ...read more.

Conclusion

younger brother Will, he later kills his wife Elizabeth on their wedding night and then his father dies, this is but another consequence of his obessesion. The death that seems to effect Frankenstein most is that of Elizabeth, he describes the effect as "why am I here to retale the destruction of the best hope an purest creature of Earth", this means that he has played a major part in the destruction of not only his wife but the "purest being on Earth". Frankenstein eventually pays the ultimate consequence for his creation of the monster with his life. After all the death of his loved ones that he has had to endure Frankenstein finally decides he has nothing more to loose and decides he will find and confront the monster but because of exhaustion he cannot go on, there is a strong sense of irony about the deaths of Frankenstein and his loved ones as they all came as a consequence of Frankenstein wanting to create life. Frankenstein is a well-known classic about on man's ambition to create life, but ironically as a result of its creation; ultimately life is destroyed. 1 Jack Sponder Explore Discuss and Consider the ways in which Shelley Presents the Discovery Scientific Possibilities, Obsession and Consequences of desire In Frankenstein ...read more.

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