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Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

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Introduction

Frankenstein. Frankenstein is usually classed as a gothic novel. It fits into the gothic tradition, purely because it contains typical features of the gothic genre, such as: Fear, The supernatural, Terror, and Tragedy. It also features exploration of what is forbidden and the dark side of the human psyche; these were often explored by gothic authors, as they were interested in them. Frankenstein fits into this tradition well. Mary Shelley's ideas came to her in a short stay in Switzerland. It was raining and herself and her friend, Lord Byron, had thought up of having a competition to see who could write the best ghost story. Mary Shelley was, at that time, living in an age of scientific experiments and research that could change the world forever. So, her ideas for the story were influenced by experiments and scientific debates of that time. She uses the concept of 'Galvanism' which was originally known as 'animal electricity'. This was the idea of 'Luigi Galvani', he suggested that there was a form of electricity different from any other, which was produced by lighting and the brain. This form of electricity made muscles move rapidly. This lead to further experiments on human corpses. Another experiment took place using another form of electricity. It was on the body of 'Thomas Forster', after he was hanged. The method was that wires were attached to the body, through different sensory parts, and a current then sent electricity around the body and the body began to move. Mary Shelley knew about these experiments as these were often discussed the great detail by popular newspapers, also pamphlets and lectures would have discussed these ideas. The novel is based on Victor Frankenstein creating a monster. This monster is abominable. Victor is in from Geneva and in his early childhood, his cousin (and lover later in the novel), Elizabeth, came to stay with his family. ...read more.

Middle

He suddenly falls ill after creating the monster, he gets better and then gets a letter from his father stating that his brother, William had been murdered. We do not yet know that the creature has killed William. The main hint in the novel is the dream that he has about his late mother and his lover, Elizabeth. He has a dream that he is holding Elizabeth in his arms and then she turns into his late mothers' corpse, he then awakens to find the monster towering above his bed. This shows that the novel is leading up to a mystery involving these people. The theme of the novel is that, there are dangers that scientific knowledge has been used incorrectly. This shows that Victor has moved his line of thoughts from God into hell or the devil. This is shown by him breaking the laws of God and man. Mary Shelley uses many references to hell in this chapter including 'demonical', 'Dante', 'frightful fiend', and 'hell'. These all suggest that the monster is created in hell or is associated with hell, also they suggest Victor dreamt of beauty but there was a death of his dreams and that why he is so bitter towards he creature and he also uses 'Dante' who was medieval artist who painted hell in his paintings could not of conceived him. These words and phrases are hints that only evil will come from what he has created. The creation entered the bedroom that Victor was resting in. Even though the monster meant well, Victor was scared by his presence. Victor saw him in a negative way, and thought that the creature wanted to kill him even though the creature was looking for love. Victor shows these feelings by stating what he felt. This is shown using negative descriptions towards the monster like' I beheld the wretch', and 'miserable monster' these phrases show that he is disgusted with the outcome of the creature. 'his eyes...... were fixed on me. ...read more.

Conclusion

At the time when the monster disappeared, it was like Victor started a whole new life, this showed that he was not really bothered about what would happen if the monster was let loosen the world. From this chapter, we find that when Victor gets engrossed in something, he forgets about the whole world around him and abandons people, like his family. Victor is prone to abandoning things and people in this chapter. For example; he abandons the monster just because of the way it looks, and hurts its feelings, making it commit murders on people close to Victor to get its own back. We find that Victor is to blame for the actions of the monster, and that Victor is very selfish. This is shown when he uses the person pronoun 'I', which shows that he is completely aware of himself and that he does not care much for other people. The secrecy in the novel is constant. Victor is always keeping secrets from his loved ones, whether large or small. The scientific ideas that Victor has are also important, as they bring together the whole story, as he knows man can create life with the correct theories and equipment. The theories that Victor has are going against God as it is an un-natural process, and that the creation will be forever criticized whether it is handsome or ugly. It also sums up how we treat each other in society today. I don not feel the same way as Victor did towards his creation. I think the actual monsters are Victor Frankenstein and M. Waldman these people both tried to create the creature, but Victor got further. They both created an abominable creature. I think some of the concerns in the novel are relevant today because not many people abandon things like children and pets, but the lucky ones get looked after. People also get abused because of the way they look, I think that this is wrong and should be stopped. ?? ?? ?? ?? By Samantha Loader Page 1 ...read more.

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