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Mid Term Break.

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Mid Term Break The college secretary came to fetch me from my first class, said she was sorry that she had to inform me of such devastating news. She did so, then left me to sit all morning in the college sick bay. The morning sun poured in through the left side window, but I suddenly felt cold all over. I turned to face the wall trembling. My head was spinning. I couldn't tell whether I felt shocked, angry, upset or all three. Later, the nurse came in and brought me some food. I counted the bells which were knelling classes to a close while I tried to force bitter-tasting sandwiches down my throat. After a while, I began to feel a little drowsy. I shut my eyes and saw a soft, swirling fog. The billows of fog lulled me into a deep, dreamless sleep. I slept until the next bell awakened me, and I pulled myself up, confused. ...read more.


My father was crying, and he looked as though he had lost everything. He had always taken funerals in his stride. He used to tell us that we should always try to deal with difficult situations without difficulty. I also remember my mother once saying that death never comes too late', well that was certainly true in this case. One of my father's friends, big Jim Evans was standing with my father. He was uncomfortably trying to console him and saying how it was a hard blow, then I left them to talk about the 'adversity' as they called it. I walked into the house in a daze, looking for my mother. My head still hurt from earlier but I felt much better. It helped to see my little brother, the baby who cooed and laughed in the pram. I stood there for a moment and watched him rock the pram. He was too young to understand, he seemed confused and bewildered but still laughed and giggled in his pram. ...read more.


I saw my mother and quickly ran over to her. I gave her a long hug as she clasped my ice-cold hands and held them tightly in hers. We had barely said a word. But then what was there to say? Nothing that we didn't both know already. Mother was not crying but I could tell just how upset she was. She coughed out angry tearless sighs, I know she was trying her very best to hide her true feelings from me but seeing her like this was just as disconcerting. I decided that I just couldn't. I pulled my hand free of hers and ran upstairs, I just couldn't bare to look at her in this state any longer. At ten o'clock the ambulance arrived with the corpse. I heard them come in while I was in bed though not asleep. I couldn't sleep but I didn't want to get up. I would go to see him in the morning. The next morning I went up to the room. I hesitated for a while, but walked on. I didn't know if I would ever feel normal again. Snow drops ...read more.

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