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Much Ado about Nothing Task: Which character do you feel more sympathetic towards Beatrice or Hero?

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Introduction

Much Ado about Nothing Task: Which character do you feel more sympathetic towards Beatrice or Hero? Shakespeare's attitude toward courtship and romance combines mature suspicion with an awareness that the social realities surrounding courtship may detract from the fun of romance. The need to marry for social superiority and to ensure inheritance, complicates romantic relationships. Although this play is a comedy ending in multiple marriages and is full of witty dialogue making for many comic moments, it also addresses more serious events, including some that border on tragedy. The personalities of Beatrice and Hero vary greatly, leading them in opposite directions with their relationships, with Beatrice headed towards a good relationship and Hero towards a bad one. The conditions under which Beatrice's and Hero's marriages occur are the effect of their personal beliefs, which relate to their personalities. Beatrice's view on the circumstances under which marriage should occur revolve around the fact that true love must be present. This is shown when Beatrice says, "With a good leg and a good foot, uncle, and money enough in his purse, such a man would win any woman in the world, if I could get her good will." (2.1.14-17) Here, she is saying that a man can possess all these qualities, but he can only have a woman is he can get her to love him. ...read more.

Middle

She is not ashamed of being rude towards him or of her outward personality. One time where Beatrice takes an authoritative role in her relationship with Benedick is after Hero is falsely accused of cheating on Claudio. In this scene, Beatrice sets conditions for their relationship. Because Beatrice is so angry with Claudio, she asks Benedick to kill him. When Benedick refuses, Beatrice says, "I am gone, though I am here; there is no love/ in you. Nay, I pray you let me go!" (4.2.291-292). Then, soon after, when Benedick is still skeptical about her request but swears by his hand that he loves her, Beatrice replies, " Use it for my love in some other way than/ swearing by it" (4.2.324-325). Benedick is finally convinced that Beatrice really believes that Claudio wronged Hero, so he says, "Enough, I am engaged. I will challenge him" (4.2.329). This persuasion of Benedick by Beatrice shows how much control she exercises in their relationship in certain situations. This occasional exercise of control is good because this way, Beatrice will not be ruled completely by Benedick, but instead, they will both have an equal amount of control in their relationship. Hero on the other hand, is the complete opposite. She takes the secondary role in the relationship, by basically letting Claudio decide what goes on in her life. ...read more.

Conclusion

These passages show that Hero's relationship was arranged from the beginning, and was not started because of personal choice, but was a result of her obedient personality. This is not the only part of the beginning of her relationship that leads her to having a worse love life than Beatrice. When Hero and Claudio are engaged, they are just mere acquaintances. Claudio just made his decision of wanting to marry her because of Hero's physical beauty. Because they had no past knowledge of each other, unlike Benedick and Beatrice, their relationship was established according to physical attraction, and not spiritual attraction. This physical judgment on both Claudio's and Hero's part was the result of their ignorant personalities, and will impact their relationship negatively. The personalities of Beatrice and Hero vary greatly, leading them in opposite directions with their relationships, with Beatrice headed towards a good relationship and Hero towards a bad one. The circumstances under which their marriages occur, their statuses in their relationships, and the ways their relationships started all play a significant role in the probable outcomes of their relationships. Beatrice's belief in marriage only under the principle of true love, her authoritative status in the relationship, and the plot in which she discovers her true feelings for Benedick all work together to help her have a better relationship. Hero's contrasting beliefs of getting married only in order to uphold family honor, her secondary status in the relationship and her arranged relationship with Claudio lead her in the opposite direction than Beatrice with her relationship. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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