• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Of Mice And Men. Most characters in the novella have revealed their dreams to the reader, which is important as dreams increasingly turn into a theme for the story.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Of Mice and Men Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck, is a novella that describes the story of 2 migrant workers, George and Lennie, who travel across California in search of work, making a living by doing manual labour. We join the protagonists when they are resting in a brush near their future workplace. The brush they are in currently is a very important place in the story where pivotal moments occur, such as the beginning and end of the story, both of which have bad events happening. The brush is a very changing place: In Chapter 1 it is a utopia, peaceful and separated from humanity, and in Chapter 6, it is dystopian due to the symbols that set the scene for the upcoming death of Lennie. The background of the novella is where Steinbeck lived through the Wall Street Crash and its effect on normal people. The crash was an event that showed people the dangers of banking and to some extent capitalism. Overnight, life savings were lost and people were forced out of their houses due to the sudden collapse in the stock exchange. This caused what many coined 'The Great Depression': A time period in which many people were made redundant and had no where to live, therefore being forced onto the streets or far away. ...read more.

Middle

This could also be taken as a sign that the times scale of the story is short or that the couple will have a good start that quickly changes to a terrible ending. Even after the death of Curley's Wife, there are suggestions that something will go wrong: "Already the sun had left the valley". This warns us of Lennie's death since Steinbeck uses light as a device to show safety. In the 6th chapter, Lennie's dreams come true when he sees a "gigantic rabbit". These could be signs of Lennie's deteriorating mental health or his growing worries for George will do to him. There are many similar scenes which intensify the story, such as the peace of the "strong and rocky Gabilan Mountains", which gives us a sense of permanence and nature, and showing the peace that it has without humans intervening. This soon changes on the late afternoon of Sunday when the negative views are shown in chapter 6's dystopia: "...Slopes of the Gabilan Mountains and hilltops were rosy in the sun". The red sun is a symbol of war in many cultures, and in this case probably symbolises danger, and the Gabilan Mountains are much less described. ...read more.

Conclusion

D�nouement is also used in the novella to structure the action: There is rising action all way from the start until Lennie's death, and then the action falls to D�nouement, where most of the 'loose ends' are tied. Some people may call the story a tragedy, but tragedies are generally about the fall of a great man, but in Of Mice and Men, Lennie is just a simple man, which makes it subverted. Throughout the novella, there is a rollercoaster of affairs and emotions, especially with George who changes his moods constantly, from shouting at Lennie for having a dead mouse to complimenting him for his handiwork. The language used in Of Mice and Men is unique because Steinbeck has purposefully written in American Slang. He makes most of the people seem almost idiotic, but, for example, the people we meet in the bunkhouse are literate and enjoy magazines. Crooks is also very clever: he reads up on his law and rights by keeping his Californian Civil Code with him and also has a dictionary, both of which he seems to dislike. In summary, Of Mice and Men is heavily based upon Dreams and how they are crushed due to the varying factors involved in the novel, most noticeably the corrupt views toward people such as Lennie, Curley's Wife and Crooks, which affect many other people's dreams. ?? ?? ?? ?? Bryn Roberts 11L ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE John Steinbeck section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE John Steinbeck essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Conflict is often shown throughout the novella of 'Of Mice and Men'. Usually, it ...

    5 star(s)

    Steinbeck's repetition of the word 'job' once again exaggerates the importance of a job and how it is a rare and vital thing. Therefore, George resents Lennie for losing his job for him. George's resentment towards Lennie bubbles over in conflict and anger.

  2. Loneliness In Of Mice and Men

    before it was officially published, an honor that encouraged 117,000 copies of the novel to be sold before its official publication on February 25, 1937. Critical response to the novel was generally positive. There were, however, critics who were offended by the rough earthiness of the characters and their lives.

  1. Of Mice and Men - summary

    After Lennie is accused of killing Curley's wife the ranch workers all go searching for the criminal. The prospect of a manhunt and the opportunity to use his luger excites Carlson, who seems to want to solve all his problems with his gun.

  2. Of Mice and Men. Explore the theme of the American dream and importance ...

    crooks wants to really join the dream so he wont feel segregated from the other men and he will actually be a part of something, a quote showing when he offers to join there dream is," He hesitated...if you...guys would want a hand to work for nothing just his keep, why I'd come an lend a hand".

  1. To what extent does Steinbeck portray dreams as futile in Of Mice and Men?

    Tha's three hundred an' fifty bucks I'd put in. I ain't much good, but I could cook and tend the chickens and hoe the garden some. How'd that be?'. With more money and another persons determination, there is new hope for the dream to become reality, perhaps even in the near future.

  2. Many Of The Characters In Of Mice And Men Have Dreams. What Are Their ...

    Work on a ranch did't always pay well ; however, the workers were provided with the necessities which had already cover a lot of costs such as a roof over their head, cooked meals, bathing facilities, so they were grateful.

  1. How important are dreams in "Of MIce and Men"?

    This can make them seem naive however, as farmers have to work whether they want to or not ? especially smallholders. When George sets out the dream, he then says that he and Lennie are ?not like those other guys?.

  2. Describe the Dreams of the Characters in "Of Mice & Men".

    ?With us it ain?t like that, we?ve got a future.? The pronouns ?us? and ?we? indicate the unity and comradeship between George and Lennie, this suggests that George aspires to share his dream because he tries to distance himself from isolation which the other migrant workers suffer from and to avoid a miserable, wasteful meaningless life.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work