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On page fifty-four, there is another good example of how weather can play a large and important part in the setting of a story, helping to develop a particular atmosphere.

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Introduction

Onpage fifty-four, there is another good example of how weather can play a large and important part in the setting of a story, helping to develop a particular atmosphere. "The square, when they got there, was all full of wind and dust, and the thin trees in the garden were lashing themselves along the railing." The reference to the weather is vital to the image of the scene. Suffocating dust pollutes the air and the railings are cage-like, preventing escape. The thin, malnourished trees give the impression that they are punishing themselves, whilst at the same time seeking refuge against the elements. This is indicative of the physical and psychological condition of Dr. Jekyll himself at this point in the story. A third example of the impact that the weather has on the atmosphere, occurs on pages forty-nine to fifty, when Mr Utterson is on his way to meet Dr Jekyll: "The court was very cool and a little damp, and full of premature twilight, although the sky, high up overhead, was still bright with sunset." ...read more.

Middle

However, the novella today would have brought about I very different reaction. Instead of shock, most people today would probably accept the novella as a confirmation of what they have always believed. ... NEW p5 'really like Satan'. This could be Stevenson's way of telling us that Hyde is not human but purely evil. Trying to hint to us, the reader, something. This obscure appearance makes other people in the book have an immediate hate for Hyde. The doctor who was tending to the girl Hyde had trampled over, whenever he looked at Hyde, wanted to kill him. The doctor had been nicknamed 'sawbones' for being so unemotional. The eyes of the family of the girl were filled with h ... NEW way that he '...snarled aloud into a savage laugh...'which suggests how he is related to evil, like a monster. Many horror stories have monsters and other characters to portray them as horrific, but Stevenson takes it a step further and makes you picture a monster of your own choice with the little information and description given to you, this builds up the tension and horror layer by layer the more you read on. ...read more.

Conclusion

The word 'haunt' frightens us. weather plays a big part in the story, it effects it by making the atmosphere feel real and heightening the horror. Stevenson uses pathetic fallacy to change the setting and atmosphere into one of which suits the story, '...it was an early cloudless night...' and '...a brilliantly lit lane...' with a '...full moon...'which gives a sense of calmness. Stevenson then gives intense action, which has a strong effect on the reader and therefore effectively heightens the horror. The action is a murder, which is very horrific anyway. s street, two doors from the corner, stands a dreary, Gothic house, which "bore in every feature the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence." As we proceed further in the novel, Jekyll�s house itself will be seen to have an inborn duality: friendly, prosperous, respectable, as well as threatening, mysterious, and sinister. This duality is manifested by each of its two facades: the respectable, Jekyll side of the house stands out in contrast with the seediness of its neighbouring structures. The Hyde fa�ade is bleak, neglected, and lowering on a stre ... ... ...read more.

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