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One of Shakespeare's most famous plays, "Much Ado" is actually both a comedy and a drama.

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Introduction

One of Shakespeare's most famous plays, "Much Ado" is actually both a comedy and a drama. The humour of Much Ado About Nothing is dependent on the situation. Shakespeare uses this mixture of creating humour and seriousness of the mood. It is also the dramatic irony, which is presented through out the play. The conventions of Shakespearian time is significant because in those days people were living under strict rules so making a comedy a play is quiet tough. Shakespeare's comedies reach a real truth and depth of human existence, which we find with the juxtaposition of merry and melancholy in Much Ado About Nothing. When we are presented a merry, festive setting in Ado: followed by a wholly unexpected and terribly unpleasant shaming of the innocent Hero, we experience a very sharp turn as an audience. ...read more.

Middle

He ends the scene by dramatic irony, tense and anxiety. Shakespeare gets a chance where he uses the conventions of comedy in Shakespearian play " Much Ado"; he brings in the two clowns that are the comedians of this play. He brings a change of mood in the audience and shows another level of Mesina society. Dogberry and Verges which sounds like a funny name start their conversation. Shakespeare has used malapropism to create humour. These two clowns are the police of Shakespearian times, who incompetence was a standing joke with Elizabethan playwrights. Dogberry being the watch he thinks he is talented in talking. He tries to sound impressive, but his efforts only result in a confused jumble of words and ideas. He may sound impressive to the Verges but the audience find it absolute drivel. ...read more.

Conclusion

They start a "merry war" between them not leaving without a reply back that is vitriolic. Beatrice's first opening line was cussing Benedick (Signor Mountano), which tells us that she hates Benedick. This hatred oxymoron In "Much Ado About Nothing", deception brings one pair of lovers together, while tearing another pair apart. One of Shakespeare's most famous plays, "Much Ado" is actually both a comedy and a drama. The lovers Beatrice and Benedick are two of the most well known characters Shakespeare created, memorable for their witty verbal sparring. They mask their affection for each other by arguing relentlessly. It is not until their friends conspire to bring them together that they admit their love for one another. Dogberry is one of Shakespeare's best fools, whose assaults on the English language rival in incompetence what Beatrice and Benedick demonstrate with competence. The war hero Claudio loves Hero; both become the victim of Don John's villainy. ...read more.

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