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Paying Particular Attention To Stevenson's Descriptions Of The City At Night, Discuss How The Writer Uses Descriptive Passages To Build Up A Mood Of Dread.

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Introduction

English Essay: Paying Particular Attention To Stevenson's Descriptions Of The City At Night, Discuss How The Writer Uses Descriptive Passages To Build Up A Mood Of Dread Stevenson uses several different devices, including his descriptions of the city at night, to build up a mood of dread. I believe that Stevenson uses the night as the time in which Hyde comes to life and commits his terrible crimes because night is normally connected with evil. The darkness of the night represents the darkness of Hyde's malevolent thoughts and deeds. This is shown in Stevenson's descriptive passages by the words he uses to convey the mood. There are several instances in Jekyll and Hyde where the night contributes to the evil deeds of Mr Hyde. On page 11, Enfield tells Utterson about the events leading to him witnessing the trampling of a young child by Hyde, in the very late hours of the night. 'coming home from some place at the end of the world, about three o'clock of a black winter morning, and my way lay through a part of town where there was literally nothing to be seen but lamps. ...read more.

Middle

Stevenson describes Hyde as a Juggernaut to show his colossal ape-like strength. Hyde is made out to be very evil by the fact that he did not stop after he hit the child. He merely carried on, ignoring her screams. This builds up the sense of dread because it shows the awfulness of Hyde. Stevenson uses the weather, in particularly fog, to create a sense of dread in several parts of the story. The first reference is on page 32 just after the terrible murder of Danvers Carew. Fog is a very obfuscating substance that does well at with concealing the evil acts of the criminals and general law- breaking people. 'A great chocolate-coloured pall lowered over heaven, but the wind was continually charging and routing these embattled vapours; Mr Utterson beheld a marvellous number of degrees and hues of twilight; for a moment, the fog would be quite broken up, and a haggard shaft of daylight would glance between the swirling wreaths. The dismal quarter of Soho seen under these changing glimpses, seemed, in the lawyer's eyes, like a district of some city in a nightmare.' ...read more.

Conclusion

Where gentlemen would work and care for their families in the daytime and then go out to brothels in the night. The Victorian society made men disguise their natural sexual instincts. It was thought to be the women's job to clean, cook and look after children. Husbands and wives would only have sex to make children and not for pleasure, it would be thought as being disgusting and wrong if this was not the case. Freud's theory comes into the book as Jekyll attempts to separate is baser self. He turns into a complete opposite in Hyde. All of his bad thoughts, and bad actions come out in Hyde. Things that would never be accepted in the Victorian society come out in Hyde. Freud's theory was that we have a split personality. One in which we act the way we have been taught and the way we should. And another where we do everything we cannot do but want to do. Stevenson does a good job in using his descriptive passages to build up the mood of dread. He uses the weather very effectively, along with the night and Hyde's association with it. ...read more.

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