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PRIDE AND PREJUDICE- MRS BENNET PRESENTATION

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Introduction

P&P- MRS BENNET PRESENTATION P&P is a romantic comedy full of lively characters, sharp wit, verbal banter and comic pauses. The central concern of this "comedy of manners" is Mrs. Bennet's dogged efforts to find suitable husbands for her eldest daughters. Mrs. Bennet's judgements cannot be trusted, for she is a nagging wife, an ineffectual mother, and a social misfit throughout the novel. Her repeated and continued foolishness is one of the things that holds the plot together into a unified whole. Mrs. Bennet is 'a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper. When she was discontented, she fancied herself nervous. The business of her life was to get her daughters married; its solace was visiting and news.' Mrs. Bennet fails by all relevant criteria according to the standards of the society. She is inconsiderate, ill-mannered, and vulgar. As a parent, she is partly responsible for the superficial characters of her three younger daughters. She thinks of marriage as a means of social and economic advancement. She has no feminine charm. On the whole, she is a failure both as a wife and a mother. Pride and Prejudice is the story of Mr. and Mrs. Bennet, their five daughters, and the various romantic adventures at Longbourn. The parents' characters are greatly contrasted, Mr. Bennet being a wise and witty gentleman while Mrs. ...read more.

Middle

Once she and Mr. Bennet take off their courting masks and Mr. Bennet discovers her "weak understanding and illiberal mind, [which] had very early in their marriage put an end to all real affection for her" we could blame Mrs. Bennet for the failures of her marriage. , Mrs. Bennet was looking for affection and financial security; Mrs. Bennet is not one to hold back her feelings. Mr. Bennet even talks of her nerves" They are my old friends. I have heard you mention them with consideration these twenty years at least". Mrs. Bennet acts under pressure to perform her emotions for the world. Mrs. Bennet's reaction toward Darcy reflects her society's general feeling, but, as one of the "most violent" against him, Mrs. Bennet takes to the extreme what her society mandates. "I am sure we owe him no particular civility as to be obliged to say nothing he may not like to hear" Having absorbed society's assumption that women should express their emotions loudly, and confident in her peers' support for her dislike of Darcy, Mrs. Bennet speaks on. Austen implicitly criticizes her society not for merely tolerating Mrs. Bennet. Mr. Bennet not only scorns his wife, he also "exposes her to the contempt of her own children" She tries, in her effusive way, to undo the damage he has done, telling the girls that she does "not know how you will ever make him amends for his kindness; or me either for that matter. ...read more.

Conclusion

Mrs. Bennet's behaviour is also a necessary for her husband's comfort. Austen writes that after the marriages of Jane and Elizabeth, Mrs. Bennet's character does not change; it is "lucky for her husband, who might not have relished domestic felicity in so unusual a form, that she still was occasionally nervous and invariably silly" The last section of the novel describes Mrs. Bennet "being quite unable to sit alone", Mrs. Bennet still lacks the thing she wants most: affection. Allowing room for Mrs. Bennet's environment as well as her crucial role in her family, we see that she is hardly detestable-she is actually forgivable. Austen presents Mrs. Bennet in a critical and funny, but understanding way. Mrs. Bennet claims, "Nobody can tell what I suffer! But it is always so. Those who do not complain are never pitied!" in chapter 20 of P&P Mrs. Bennet represents the incompetent parent. a flat character who represent distorted moral values. Mrs. Bennet concerns herself with marrying her daughters off. The Bennets are poor parents. Austen shows Mrs. Bennet's incompetence by means of humorous characterization and exaggerated satirical dialogue.. Mrs. Bennet reveals her absurd nature when she claims that she is not pitied because she never complains, right after she has complained about all she suffers. Mrs. Bennet has the notion that her children should be grateful for having them for parents. Because Lizzie will not marry Mr. Collins, Mrs. Bennet calls her "undutiful." She is not only wholly dislikeable, but also humorous in their exaggerated characterizations. ...read more.

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