• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Remind yourself of the passage in the middle of chapter 9 of Wuthering Heights from "Nelly do you never dream…." As far as "No I'll not promise."(p.57) Discuss the importance of the passage in relation to your reading of the novel.

Extracts from this document...


Remind yourself of the passage in the middle of chapter 9 of Wuthering Heights from "Nelly do you never dream...." As far as "No I'll not promise."(p.57) Discuss the importance of the passage in relation to your reading of the novel In your answer you should * Explain your own view of Cathy at this point in the novel; * Look closely at the effects of the ways in which she expresses her feelings for Linton and Heathcliff; * Comment on what the passage suggests about conflict between personal feelings and social expectations, in your reading of the novel as a whole. In chapter 9, Cathy confides in Nelly, telling her of Edgar's proposal of marriage. She confesses to having said yes, mainly for the social status attached and because it would be the right thing to do. After much discussion as to whether she has made the right decision or not, Cathy asks Nelly - "Nelly do you ever dream queer dreams?" She recounts a nightmare that she once had, and this upsets Nelly, as she is quite superstitious about them - "I tell you I won't harken to your dreams, Miss Catherine!" ...read more.


seems to represent her marriage to Edgar Linton. Heaven is with Edgar, but she recognises that she does not belong with him when she says, "I've no more business to marry Edgar Linton than I have to be in heaven...". She also admits that she does loves Heathcliff, "... how I love him...", but she knows that she cannot not marry him. She understands that she must marry a rich and respected man, which is what Edgar Linton is, and not Heathcliff. This passage also represents the expectations of women in the time the book was written, when social upbringing played a large part in who you were supposed to mixed with. Cathy does not realise, but Heathcliff is in the room listening to the conversation. This chapter is the turning point in the book where Heathcliff feels betrayed, hurt and angry after he hears Cathy say "it would degrade me to marry Heathcliff." However he runs away before he hears the rest, where Cathy says, "So he shall never know how I love him." ...read more.


She is just describing here how different she sees herself and Edgar. The moonbeam represents Edgar because it is a soft light, showing Edgar's tender and caring nature. Lightening, on the other hand, is powerful and dramatic; it is full of action and represents Catherine's fierce temper, unpredictability and destructiveness. A moonbeam is constant and expected; it never changes. Fire, on the other hand, seems to show a great deal of passion. It is uncontrollable, raging and unpredictable. This is where Catherine puts Edgar down, showing that he is lacking passion. Again this relates back to the personality of Catherine. She believes that her and Heathcliff are one together. She means a similar thing as to the soul reference when she says, "I am Heathcliff!" She simply means that they are so much alike that they could not possibly have so much love for anyone else. It is something that she mentions on many occasions, including "He's always, always in my mind: not as pleasure... but as my own being." She is a part of Heathcliff as he is part of her. Shaneen Makhani ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Emily Bronte section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Emily Bronte essays

  1. In the earth, the earth thou shalt be laid... and answer the following questions

    and, therefore, the dead themselves: "And all who loved thy living face Shall shrink from its gloom and thee" The second's voice gives an emphatic rejection to the first's ideas. It suggests that, far from cold being the characteristic of death, it characterises the falsehood of the world and human

  2. Lockwood's Dreams.

    The female gender isolated from supremacy, command and authority in this book as far as the society is concerned at the time and Bronte shows this. Feminist criticism has seen the novel in terms of its language, and in terms of its strategies and opportunities that are open to women in the novel.

  1. Show how Cathy's desire for social status changes her personality throughout her life and ...

    As Cathy's social status changes, her personality becomes worse. Bront� wrote wuthering heights in the 19th century when social class was of high priority so in the novel, wuthering heights, it contributes to Cathy's desires. Emily Bront� was a contrast of her character, Cathy, she was unsocial and reserved but yearned for the freedom of the moors, as she

  2. Discuss Jane Austen's use of settings in the novel Northanger Abbey, showing how this ...

    that go on and the period in which the novel is set help to make up for that. Bath is shown to be a very fashionable place as Catherine discovers on her first few days which she spends 'learning what was mostly worn' and being provided with 'a dress of the newest fashion'.

  1. In chapter 15 Nelly says "Far better that she should be dead than lingering ...

    However Catherine soon develops a close relationship with Heathcliff given that she becomes a protector and friend, "Miss Cathy and he were now very thick; but Hindley hated him" - pg. 46. Growing up, Catherine and Heathcliff's relationship develops. They become very close and share special times on the moors;

  2. Refer to chapter one of Wuthering Heights and comment on how Emily Brontë introduces ...

    filtered through his character and prejudices and then expanded on through Lockwood's fancy use of language. Against the contrast of Heathcliff's and Joseph's monosyllabic, straight to the point returns, Lockwood's use of the word 'penetralium' instead of house, and 'domestics' and 'establishment' pick up on how out of place Lockwood's airs are.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work