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Remind yourself of the passage in the middle of chapter 9 of Wuthering Heights from "Nelly do you never dream…." As far as "No I'll not promise."(p.57) Discuss the importance of the passage in relation to your reading of the novel.

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Introduction

Remind yourself of the passage in the middle of chapter 9 of Wuthering Heights from "Nelly do you never dream...." As far as "No I'll not promise."(p.57) Discuss the importance of the passage in relation to your reading of the novel In your answer you should * Explain your own view of Cathy at this point in the novel; * Look closely at the effects of the ways in which she expresses her feelings for Linton and Heathcliff; * Comment on what the passage suggests about conflict between personal feelings and social expectations, in your reading of the novel as a whole. In chapter 9, Cathy confides in Nelly, telling her of Edgar's proposal of marriage. She confesses to having said yes, mainly for the social status attached and because it would be the right thing to do. After much discussion as to whether she has made the right decision or not, Cathy asks Nelly - "Nelly do you ever dream queer dreams?" She recounts a nightmare that she once had, and this upsets Nelly, as she is quite superstitious about them - "I tell you I won't harken to your dreams, Miss Catherine!" ...read more.

Middle

seems to represent her marriage to Edgar Linton. Heaven is with Edgar, but she recognises that she does not belong with him when she says, "I've no more business to marry Edgar Linton than I have to be in heaven...". She also admits that she does loves Heathcliff, "... how I love him...", but she knows that she cannot not marry him. She understands that she must marry a rich and respected man, which is what Edgar Linton is, and not Heathcliff. This passage also represents the expectations of women in the time the book was written, when social upbringing played a large part in who you were supposed to mixed with. Cathy does not realise, but Heathcliff is in the room listening to the conversation. This chapter is the turning point in the book where Heathcliff feels betrayed, hurt and angry after he hears Cathy say "it would degrade me to marry Heathcliff." However he runs away before he hears the rest, where Cathy says, "So he shall never know how I love him." ...read more.

Conclusion

She is just describing here how different she sees herself and Edgar. The moonbeam represents Edgar because it is a soft light, showing Edgar's tender and caring nature. Lightening, on the other hand, is powerful and dramatic; it is full of action and represents Catherine's fierce temper, unpredictability and destructiveness. A moonbeam is constant and expected; it never changes. Fire, on the other hand, seems to show a great deal of passion. It is uncontrollable, raging and unpredictable. This is where Catherine puts Edgar down, showing that he is lacking passion. Again this relates back to the personality of Catherine. She believes that her and Heathcliff are one together. She means a similar thing as to the soul reference when she says, "I am Heathcliff!" She simply means that they are so much alike that they could not possibly have so much love for anyone else. It is something that she mentions on many occasions, including "He's always, always in my mind: not as pleasure... but as my own being." She is a part of Heathcliff as he is part of her. Shaneen Makhani ...read more.

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