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Romeo and juliet

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ENGLISH COURSEWORK: ROMEO AND JULIET THE VIOLENT SCENES. Violence and conflicts are central to ``Romeo and Juliet``. Discuss this theme with reference to at least 3 scenes in the play Romeo and Juliet. In the play Romeo and Juliet there is conflict, which informs us about the rivalry between the Montague and the Capulet families. In the chorus of the play it is quoted that, "from ancient grudge break to mutiny". This quote informs us about the moral abuse between these two families. There is a quote, which states, "Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean with a Montague or a Capulet blood". This quote symbolises to us that these two families have so much hatred between each other that they both would be willing to see their hands unclean with a Montague or Capulet blood. The chorus makes our understanding clear about the Montague and the Capulet past conflicts. The first scene I will be studying will be act 1 scene1. This is the first scene of the play, in this scene the violence starts when Gregory and Sampson walk through the street of Verona. ...read more.


Tybalt is not impressed, therefore he orders Romeo to pull out his sword. So a conflict could be started. It is quoted Tybalt saying, "Boy this shall not excuse thee injuries. That thou have done me, therefore turn and draw". Romeo refuses to start a conflict and he decides to walk away. Mercutio enters the conversation and he starts to make fun of Tybalt by calling him a, "rat catcher". Tybalt loses his temper and he offers Mercutio a fight. It is quoted Tybalt saying, "What wouldst thou have with me"? This tells us that Tybalt wants a conflict to start between himself and Mercutio. Romeo does not start a conflict with Tybalt because he tells Tybalt that they are cousins. Therefore this makes Tybalt even angrier because now his main enemy is his cousin therefore Tybalt decides that he has to kill Romeo to keep his families pride. Mercutio steps into the argument because he feels embarrassed for Romeo. Therefore he decides to fight because he wants to save Romeo's pride. When Mercutio and Tybalt are in conflict, Romeo tells them not to fight in the streets of Verona or the prince will forbid them from the streets of Verona. ...read more.


Once Romeo has sacrificed his life for his love then Friar Lawrence comes running to let Romeo know about Juliet, but by the time he arrives Romeo has died. As Romeo has past away Juliet starts to awake, she firstly asks for her love Romeo. Then she realises that Romeo is dead beside her. At first Juliet finds it difficult to control her sad emotions. Then Juliet decides to descend to heaven with Romeo. She decides this because Juliet has realised that Romeo has died for her. At this stage of the scene we will witness violence because Juliet will take her life to join Romeo. It is quoted Juliet saying, "O happy dagger, this is thy sheath; there rust, and let me die". This quote tells us that Juliet will descend to heaven by and join Romeo; by taking her life. I believe that, if Juliet had not taken the sleep potion then the deaths Romeo, Juliet and Paris's deaths could have been avoided in this scene. The reason Shakespeare uses violence throughout this play is because he wants to keep the audiences attention. We also know that Shakespeare is quoted to say, "Those who live by the sword die by the sword". This can be seen throughout this play. ...read more.

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