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Romeo and Juliet

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Introduction

Romeo & Juliet This essay will be discussing how Juliet's character changes from the beginning of the play till in Act 3 Scene 2. In the beginning of the play Juliet is like any other young, na�ve, girl in the Elizabethan times, who were not given much freedom, independence and were not treated with much respect. In the Elizabethan times Young middle class girls were married of at the age of fourteen and they were expected to be obedient and shy by the society, back then status, honour, and pride meant a lot to rich families such as the Capulets and Montagues, and marrying a mortal enemy was completely disgraceful even if it was for your child's happiness. Parents were more concerned about their pride and honour rather than the happiness of their children. Wealthy families such as the Capulets and Montagues had to worry a lot about what the society thought of them and had to keep a good reputation for the eyes of the society. Honour was the most important thing to them. In the play Juliet is of an age that stands on the border between immaturity and maturity. At the beginning of the play Shakespeare portraits her character to be merely an obedient, insecure, sheltered, na�ve child who would leave all her life decisions up to her parents. ''I'll look to like, if looking liking move (...) ...read more.

Middle

In Act 3 Scene 2, as Juliet speaks to herself, she has become more romantic which is obvious through her speech. All she could think about Is Romeo and how he would come, ''Leap to these arms, untalk'd of and unseen (...) if love be blind, It best agrees with night'' These lines show that she just wants to be with Romeo and spend the night with her one and only love. In Act 3 Scene 2 you can see that Juliet's character is more defensive, mature and confident bearing in mind that women were not equal to men. She is also a girl from an aristocratic family, she has none of the freedom Romeo has, such as roaming around the city, climbing over walls in the middle of the night, or get into swordfights, and even so she shows amazing trust in Romeo with her life and future. The closest person to Juliet is the Nurse and Juliet is willing to remove the Nurse from her life, the moment the Nurse turns against Romeo, especially when the nurse calls Romeo shameful for murdering Tybalt, Juliet gets furious and feels offended by this and shouts at the Nurse and goes against her ''Blister'd be thy tongue for such a wish! He was not born to shame (...) O, what a beast was I to chide at him!'' ...read more.

Conclusion

She becomes more experienced because at first she was inexperienced. After meeting Romeo her character changes romantic and from a little girl to an independent woman, Romeo's love was what bought her to such independence and also the tragedy of her cousin's death. By the end of the play Juliet's character is full of confidence and she is expressive of her thoughts, and she values love and marriage more. Shakespeare shows this maturation directly after Juliet's wedding night, as she faces a sexual experience, at first Juliet seems to have no friends her own age, and she is not comfortable talking about sex, as seen in her discomfort when the Nurse goes on and on about a sexual joke at Juliet's expense in Act 1 Scene 3. Having a husband makes her feel more confident and mature as she is in a relationship. She is more independent in a sense that she makes her own decisions and her parents can't make her do as they wish anymore. Later on in the play when Juliet wakes in the tomb to find Romeo dead, she does not commit suicide out of feminine weakness, but more out of an intensity of love, just as Romeo did, when he assumed she was dead. Juliet's suicide truly required more courage than Romeo's: while he swallows poison, she stabs herself through the heart with a dagger. Juliet's development from an insecure young girl into a self-assured, dedicated, and capable woman is one of Shakespeare's early triumphs of characterization. ATIYA CHOUDHURY YEAR 11 ...read more.

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